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The Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 68 - Georgi Dinkov 2

The Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 68 - Georgi Dinkov 2

In this episode of The Thermo Diet Podcast Jayton Miller sits down with independent researcher, entrepreneur, and fellow metabolism fanatic Gerogi Dinkov. In this episode they talk about an average day in the life of Georgi Dinkov, vitamin D + vitamin K supplementation, new products Georgi has in the works, ways to increase brain performance, and so much more. Check it out and let us know what you think!

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Full Transcript:

Jayton Miller:
Welcome back to the Thermo Diet Podcast. I'm your host Jayton Miller, and today I have on the podcast none other than Georgi Dinkov. This episode is absolutely amazing, so we actually go through a day in the life of what Georgi actually does from day-to-day. We talk about some of the new products that he's working on.

Jayton Miller:
We talk about vitamin D and some of its possible benefits in regards to not only protective hormones, but to cancer and other kinds of therapies. And then we also talk a little bit about some of the best ways to increase brain performance outside of increasing metabolic rate, lowering serotonin, and stress hormones. So, I'm super excited for you all to be able to listen to this one. Let's dive in.

Jayton Miller:
Welcome back, guys. Today I have on the podcast Mr. Georgi Dinkov. How are you doing today Georgi?

Georgi Dinkov:
Doing fine. Thank you for asking. Thanks for inviting me again.

Jayton Miller:
Yes, sir. I really appreciate your time and thank you for hopping on here.

Georgi Dinkov:
Thanks. Hopefully, we can provide some value to your listeners.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. So, I got a handful of questions from people in our community group on Facebook, and the first one that was on there was what does a day in the life of Georgi actually look like? Do you have any kinds of routines or habits or supplement protocols that you like to follow?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I mean, I wouldn't call it routine because it changes all the time, but there are certain things that happening on a daily basis. Some of them because I have two children and a wife, so that's basically this given, right? And then there's also things that are related to the business because I have two jobs. I have a day job and also the supplement business. And also, now I'm involved with a research group in Bulgaria. So, we're now starting to do studies.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, because of these three things that more or less don't change, they're there every day, there is some routine, but things get shifted back and forth all the time depending on what takes priority. So, when I wake up, basically, I drink coffee. One cup. I'm not really a big coffee drinker. I actually prefer tea, but I find that one cup in the morning is really good for stimulating digestion, and for basically giving me some energy throughout the day without stressing me out. If I start drinking it too often, I do get the higher energy, but also it starts to interfere with my sleep. And if it-

Jayton Miller:
Is that black?

Georgi Dinkov:
Yeah, black. Basically, I drink black coffee. Sometimes I add milk. Sometimes if I don't have time to make it, I go to the local CVS store and I buy these... There's a outfit called Peet's Coffee. It's originally from California, and they sell these cans of vanilla latte. Then also sometimes I drink the double espresso shots that are also in a can by Starbucks. There are also a number of different varieties at this point we can get that's basically iced coffee, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, sometimes I drink those, but basically, one of those a day is usually what I do in the morning because anything more than that then basically I start getting... Not manic, but I get hyper, and then if I drink it after five o'clock, it tends to keep me awake after midnight, which I don't want. I realized the value of sleep. So, that's pretty much it.

Georgi Dinkov:
In the morning with the coffee, I also take aspirin, and I take either vitamin K or methylene blue because those are... I take them mostly for their quinone properties, in other words, oxidizing agents. And because caffeine combined with pretty much any other substance increases the bioavailability. And also, for some reason unknown to this point, increases the effects of... And this was first discovered back in... I think it was in the 1970s when bodybuilders in Europe basically discovered that they can... Because at the time the steroids they were getting were very expensive. Everything was bootleg and there weren't that many labs producing them. So, if you get your hands on some steroids, you want to make them last for as long as possible, and of course, be as powerful as possible.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, they discovered that if you drink a cup of coffee and then you take any of the steroids, you can get away with a dosage that's two to five times lower and still get the same effects. And this has since been confirmed to be true of caffeine and other xanthine derivatives such as theacrine and even uric acid. So, if you coingest or coadminister any component with one of those chemicals, the xanthine derivatives, basically you can get much stronger effects and they will last longer for as long as caffeine stays in your body, which is a few hours. And also, the effects will be more potent.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, that's why I usually take one of the quinones, either methylene blue or vitamin K in the morning. And then, if it's vitamin K, I also take a little bit of vitamin B with it because they have a highly synergistic effect. And then-

Jayton Miller:
Do you know about vitamin C enhancing the bioavailability of certain supplements as well?

Georgi Dinkov:
Yes, mostly of iron and mostly metals, but especially iron. So, recently, I discovered several studies say that vitamin C can also enhance the bioavailability of magnesium as well. I don't know about the effects though, right? Caffeine is unique that it not only enhances the bioavailability but also somehow makes the cell more permeable to that specific chemical. And it may also somehow enhance the genomic effects if this chemical is acting on receptors. It's a steroid, right? Most steroids are active with either androgen, estrogen, progesterone receptors, or cortisol receptors.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, maybe the caffeine enhances the association of those steroids with the respective receptor and prevents the dissociation, which is when they stop acting, right? But in terms of vitamin C, I know that it enhances the bioavailability of most metals that it is coadministered with, especially iron. And I think that's one reason why I think Peat has been saying that people with anemia, he recommends eating liver. But if they feel like they need the extra oomph like raising the hemoglobin or the ferritin or the [inaudible 00:05:59] saturation index, he's saying drink a glass of orange juice after you eat that liver portion. And then you'll be getting a much stronger kick out of the iron than if you only ingest it on its own.

Georgi Dinkov:
And then after that, basically for breakfast I try to eat eggs on a daily basis. Depending on how I feel PUFA-wise, which is pretty easy because if you're ingesting a lot of PUFA it gives you the estrogenic histaminic serotonergic effect. So, if I feel fine, then I will usually eat two eggs, and there is Safeway. I don't know if they have Safeway in Texas or in Colorado, but they sell it... They're one of the few stores if not the only store at this point which sells organic boiled peeled eggs.

Georgi Dinkov:
And since time is of the essence, I don't really have time to boil the eggs and peel them myself every morning, I buy... They have these packs. I think it's like six or eight eggs in a pack. So, I have a few of those in my fridge. I take one or two out, slice it up, and then I eat that egg with some cheese and some orange juice, and that's pretty much my breakfast.

Georgi Dinkov:
I try to get about 50 grams of protein in the morning because I found out that if you don't get your protein in the morning or lunch meal, if you try to eat a lot of protein at night, it also keeps you awake mostly because it lowers serotonin and increases dopamine because of the basically... Protein has that effect. It outcompetes tryptophan for absorption into the brain. And then if that protein contains tyrosine or phenylalanine, which most of them do if they're complete proteins, then you're going to get these are the precursors to dopamine and thyroid hormone. So, you're going to get that energetic effect kick in, and you don't want that after midnight.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I try to eat most of my protein in the first and second meal, and then at night, I try to eat mostly carbs. Some protein as well, but usually casein. Cheese is a good one, yogurt. Greek yogurt is a great one. So, eating a little bit of sweet Greek yogurt or Greek yogurt unsweetened with some honey, things like that is usually good as a night snack.

Georgi Dinkov:
But I try not to eat more than 20 grams of protein for the night. Basically, for my night meal, for my evening meal. So, if I have to ingest about 100 grams of protein daily, that leaves about 80 grams remaining throughout the day. And so, I try in the morning and lunch to eat them about equally. So, 40, 50 each.

Georgi Dinkov:
I eat the cheese; I eat the eggs. I've already drank the coffee, and then basically depending on how I feel, sometimes I don't feel the need to eat lunch, but I continue to drink sweetened beverages. Try to do mostly orange juice. If that's not available, and if I don't have... I mean, I buy them from Whole Foods and Safeway. They have a freshly squeezed one, but if that runs out. If my kids and my wife drank it up, then basically I go to CVS and buy something from there. It's really poor-quality orange juice, but it's better than just drinking plain sugar water, which lacks a lot of the nutrients that are necessary to metabolize the carbohydrates.

Georgi Dinkov:
If there's no orange juice then I drink apple juice, that's second best, or grape juice. Because those two, apple and grape juice are mostly fructose. So, you will not need as many of the cofactors to metabolize it because it doesn't raise insulin as much as a Coke would do or an orange juice would do. But orange has potassium and some of the bioflavonoids like naringenin, and those help process the sugar as well, without raising insulin too much.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I prefer orange juice. If that's not available, then there's several other options, several juices. And if none of that's available, then I fall back onto Coke or Pepsi or whatever is available in that local store. Preferably with sugar, but sometimes if there's nothing else suitable, I will take the high fructose corn syrup option because it's better to keep your energy levels up and keep you going than going to hypoglycemia and trigger cortisol/insulin/adrenaline stress response.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, if I eat at lunch, I try to eat mostly lean protein and something sweet. Ray mentioned that sometimes he eats steak and marmalade or jam. I found that pretty easy option to obtain in the local stores or grocery stores or even cafeterias, which have started to reopen, but they don't allow you now to take your own food from the buffet. You go there and you tell them what you want. They go and scoop it up for you. I don't know how this is any better or less risky, but that's how it is right now.

Georgi Dinkov:
And then in the afternoon, I eat a carrot salad. I try to make that a daily routine. Basically, there's local grocery stores. All of them are selling... They sell shredded carrots, so I dump a little bit of carrots, maybe about a cup into a glass container, put salt on top of it, let the salt absorb. And actually, it softens up the carrot, because sometimes the sticks are really hard, they're not very pleasant to chew on.

Georgi Dinkov:
And you're not supposed to be chewing them up completely. You're supposed to be getting that elongated piece of carrot into your digestive tract so you can actually literally scrub it and get rid of the biofilm, which is what the bacteria creates to protect itself from antibiotics and digestive juices and all kinds of other mechanisms the body has for getting rid of it. The bacteria forms biofilm, and it attaches to the wall of the intestine, and basically, these elongated pieces of carrot that you're ingesting undigested, they help to literally scrub the biofilm off and basically excrete it later on.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I eat that, and I try to eat it with regular... I shouldn't say regular. Organic, either apple cider or regular vinegar. And then for oil, I use the coconut oil even though Ray has said that it irritates his GI tract when he uses it orally. Not for me, so I use that because coconut oil itself has a very potent antibacterial effect. Especially the lauric and the caprylic acids, fatty acids that are inside the coconut oil.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I sprinkle a little bit on the carrots. First, the salt, then the vinegar, stir it up and then you put the oil last. And I eat that, and after that basically, that's maybe around 4:00 or 5:00 in the afternoon. And then in the evening, which is like I said, try to eat mostly sweet stuff. A little bit of protein to basically keep that serotonin as low as possible because that's what protein does. And because casein is a slow-digesting protein, it keeps you fed and satisfied throughout the night.

Georgi Dinkov:
I've noticed that if I try to drink just regular milk or I've tried in the past to also do protein supplements. When I take whey, basically, it makes me very hot and sweaty for maybe two or three hours and I sleep very deeply. Then I wake up in the middle of the night at 3:00 AM and I feel exhausted. And I feel the need to eat or drink, which means it triggered that insulin response, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
It raised metabolism, but whey is very insulinogenic, and then at some point, it triggered a insulin/cortisol response, and it wakes me up because the body says, "I'm out of fuel. Got to give me something else." If you don't want to continue with the adrenaline/lipolysis/fatty acid oxidation, which I really don't.

Georgi Dinkov:
Yeah, so Greek yogurt is great. They have at least 40 flavors. Different ones available in the local store. I usually go with a vanilla flavor because it has the least amount of additives. I make sure that the label says that it doesn't contain things like... Not that it's a guarantee, but at least if the label says that it contains things like carrageenan and the various gums like xanthan gum, acacia gum, carob bean gum, whatnot, then you're guaranteed that they've put a lot of those in there.

Georgi Dinkov:
If it doesn't say, then you may have traces of it, and they actually warn you. It says, "This product has been produced in a facility that also packages, processes the following things like peanuts." They do this for allergy reasons, right? Some people are allergic to peanuts. But they also say it may contain trace amounts of... And then they list all these gums, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, trace amounts fine, right? But at least it's not being put there deliberately as an emulsifier, which is what the ones that when the label says it contains them, then you know they're there, and they're there in significant amounts. Usually, up to 5% of the total contents, and that's a lot. I don't know if you've seen some of the studies that I've posted lately on the forum showing that despite the reassurances that all of these gums are safe, actually, these gums are capable of causing bleeding disorders in the brain. And if that doesn't sound serious enough to you, then I don't know what will, right? So, I avoid these things as much as I can.

Georgi Dinkov:
That's about it. I mean, in terms of other supplements, so sometimes I take niacinamide if I feel like I'm getting a lipolysis response if I forgot to eat or if I'm under extra stress. Usually, a little bit of niacinamide with aspirin stops it right in its tracks. But I don't do this every day. It's basically like I try to not use supplements on a daily basis except for the quinones because of their oxidizing power, and vitamin D, which has a number of different effects. The most important probably of which is, and I just recently discovered it, which may explain why Peat has been recommending so often, is that vitamin D turns out to be the most potent endogenous pro-differentiation factor.

Georgi Dinkov:
And there are several studies which I'm going to post on my blog in the next few days that show that slightly higher dosage than what is usually recommended by doctors. Most doctors will tell you don't take more than 5,000 units per day. Well, these animal studies with the equivalent of about 10,000 units per day show that vitamin D, specifically the cholecalciferol, which is the vitamin D3 is capable of turning really aggressive and metastatic cancer cells back to normal.

Georgi Dinkov:
And I was completely taken aback. I said, "Wow, we've been told by medicine that cancer cells cannot revert back to normal after they're cancerous. You either have to kill them or they kill you." It's kind of like the us versus them. It's the whole war idea. The war on cancer. And now these studies are saying, "No, actually, if you raise the concentration of vitamin D inside those cancer cells, something happens." And they don't know exactly what, but these cells revert back to normal.

Georgi Dinkov:
And one of the most defining characteristics of reverting back to normal is that the [inaudible 00:16:23] effect disappears. So, these cells stop overproducing lactate, and they start behaving like normal cells. Now, the studies didn't last that long, so I guess you can always have the option of, "Well, as soon as you stop administering vitamin D maybe they will revert back to cancerous." But that's actually besides the point, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
If you have something like vitamin D that can keep the cancer into permanent remission, which to me is the same as cure. Yeah, I mean, you may have to take it for as long as you live, but isn't that infinitely better than the kind of treatments that we're currently having on the market for cancer? So, anyways, very interesting, and these studies also mention in passing that progesterone is another such chemical. And to the listeners that don't know, vitamin D may be called a vitamin, but it's actually a steroid. More specifically a sickle steroid, which sickle means broken up or parted apart.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, if you look at the structure of vitamin D, the core is almost the same as steroids such as progesterone and testosterone, but a portion of one of the rings is missing. But it's still capable of binding and interacting with all of the receptors that steroids like progesterone and testosterone and [inaudible 00:17:31] are interacting with. And these studies that dealt with vitamin D said, "Oh, by the way, yeah, vitamin D is the most potent pro-differentiation factor we've seen so for. And other ones include things like progesterone, and potentially some of the androgens." They didn't name testosterone specifically, but there aren't that many androgens to choose from.

Georgi Dinkov:
Basically, it's testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and a few other metabolites of them, right? So, I thought it was three or four studies that were pretty neat, and they all... They didn't cite each other, which means these discoveries were arrived at independently by different groups, which to me is usually a very strong indication that whatever they found out tends to be the case. Because when people start citing each other's work, you never know what's the political game there. Maybe one group is working with the other. They're trying to prop up each other's research, et cetera, et cetera, compete for funding. Help each other with funding because they work together.

Georgi Dinkov:
Whenever several groups independently over several years discover the same thing, usually in science, that's considered a pretty reliable signal that things are on the right path.

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). Do you think that is because it's taking away electrons from the cancer cells?

Georgi Dinkov:
I think it's mostly because of its effect as a cortisol and estrogen antagonist, and progesterone agonist. And also, there are several studies that show that when you administer vitamin D with androgens, just like caffeine, it potentiates their effects. It doesn't increase the bioavailability, but it potentiates the effects several times while also protecting from their side effects.

Georgi Dinkov:
And they're not exactly sure how exactly that works. Is it something in the receptor that vitamin D does? But there's actually a company in the Netherlands which filed for patent in 2008 and was granted one, and basically, now they're trying to commercialize a combination of the anabolic steroid nandrolone, which bodybuilders love to inject with. A combination with basically... I think it's like 100 milligrams of nandrolone with 4,000 units of vitamin D3 and cholecalciferol.

Georgi Dinkov:
And they're citing multiple studies showing the exact same thing, and also their own studies with humans showing that when they administered the nandrolone to people... First, they try animals. They show that if you abuse nandrolone, it starts to cause fibrosis especially of the kidneys, of the heart, and often of the lungs and liver as well. But when you add that high dosage of vitamin D, all of these side effects disappear while the steroid maintaining its anabolic effect.

Georgi Dinkov:
And that's the Holy Grail in steroid chemistry. You want to develop something that gives you the anti-catabolic and pro-anabolic effects without any side effects. If you come up with a molecule like that, you're God. You'll be very, very rich person and highly respected. And this company's saying, "Well, maybe we don't need to when we can use one of the existing steroids and administer with vitamin D and all the side effects disappear."

Georgi Dinkov:
But my guess because why vitamin D has these effects on cancerous cells proliferation, I believe it's mostly because it blocks. It acts as an antagonist of both the cortisol and the estrogen receptor. Now, the fact that estrogen receptor antagonists they're already known to be pro-differentiating. This is something that's been used in breast cancer medicine for a long time. At least five decades.

Georgi Dinkov:
We have the toxic, but still effective drugs such as tamoxifen, clomiphene, raloxifene. They're all synthetic estrogens, but the way they work is their estrogenic effect is tissue specific. In the breast, they act as antiestrogens, but unfortunately, in the uterus and the ovaries and cervix, they act as pro-estrogens. So, when they treat women with breast cancer, with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer with these drugs, these drugs block the estrogen receptor, cure the breast cancer, but cause other cancer as a side effect.

Georgi Dinkov:
Now, vitamin D blocks the estrogen receptor without causing any of these side effects. So, that's part of the benefit. We already know that estrogen receptor antagonists are highly beneficial. The opinion in medicine was that "Well, estrogen is only important for breast cancer." It turned out that it's not the case. Now, it's already confirmed as a causative factor in all of the female reproductive tract cancers, including the ovarian, endometrial, uterine, and cervical, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, now they're trying to repurpose things like tamoxifen and clomiphene as treatments for those cancers as well, right? And they're also doing the same thing for aromatase inhibitors, which lower the synthesis of estrogen.

Georgi Dinkov:
Anyway, so vitamin D, estrogen receptor antagonist. Good thing, right? But also, it acts as an antagonist of the cortisol receptor, and a few recent studies show that the so-called abortion pill known as RU-486 and also mifepristone, which to most people they know it as the abortion pill because that's how it's been marketed, and that has been its most common usage.

Georgi Dinkov:
But when the French company Uclaf developed it in the '80s, they actually developed it as a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. They actually were developing specifically for treating issues such as Cushing disease, which is the disease of excess cortisol. However, they realized that tree isn't that much of a market. It tends to be a very rare condition.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, then this drug they developed, the marketing agency and the company said, "Hold on a second. Is it only a cortisol receptor antagonist or does it have other effects as well?" They said, "Oh, it also blocks the progesterone receptor." "Excellent. We're going to use it as an abortion pill," because if you block the progesterone receptors, you're causing an abortion if the woman is already having one because the progesterone is the hormone that maintains the pregnancy.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, this became known as the abortion pill, while in reality, by design, it was actually a cortisol antagonist. So, this drug now has been granted by the FDA. I think it's like an orphan drug status or something very unique. And now, because they found that this can cure terminal cancers of the lung, of the prostate, of the brain. And these individual case studies published were in humans.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, basically, by blocking cortisol, this drug is capable of essentially curing a number of different lethal cancers, and they're already at the metastatic stage four condition, where basically you have one last shot at taming it down with chemotherapy or radiation because at this point it's already inoperable because the metastasis are everywhere, right? And after that, you get declared terminal, and you get sent away to a hospice.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, this was found that this cortisol blocker can cure... I'll send you the link. It was in a popular press. I think this was either in The Atlantic or The Wall Street Journal where the doctor who worked with these patients, he's the one who applied and said, "Wow, we may have a cancer cure in this one drug." Just in the very advanced cancers that we don't know how to treat at all.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, if vitamin D can do both of these things, that alone is enough to potentially explain most of its pro-differentiating and anticancer effect. But it's got other effects as well. It tends to potentiate the effects of thyroid, the thyroid hormone T3, and the thyroid receptor. It also tends to lower prolactin. It's known to lower parathyroid hormone, and almost every person with cancer is known to have an elevation of what is called PTHRP, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, it's something very similar to the parathyroid hormone, but it's produced by cancer cells, and it has the same pro-inflammatory, pro-serotonin, pro-prolactin, pro-estrogenic antimetabolic effects. And because vitamin D is known to suppress the synthesis of parathyroid hormone, several researchers tried about 20 years ago to see if vitamin D has the same suppressive effects on PTHRP. It turns out this does.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, if this PTHRP is produced by most cancer cells, and it's a very potent dedifferentiating factor, vitamin D suppressing it, that explains a good portion of its anticancer pro-differentiating effects. I think I mentioned it synergize with thyroid hormone. It also tends to suppress directly the synthesis of TRH, which is the initial cascade of the thyroid hormone synthesis, which is the thyrotropin-releasing hormone, which is produced by the hypothalamus.

Georgi Dinkov:
It's similar to the CRH, which is basically the first step of the adrenal/cortisol cascade. So, the TRH is the first step in the thyroid cascade, but it's known that TRH and TSH, which is a pituitary hormone are both themselves highly inflammatory, and increase the growth of cancers. So, if you can suppress the levels of either one of these or both, it's known to have a very strong therapeutic effect in cancers, and virtually any chronic inflammatory condition, which cancer is.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, if vitamin D has suppressing effect on those peptides, the TRH, and the TSH, that's yet another explanation of why you would expect it to have a pro-differentiating anticancer effect.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. Wow. How recent are some of these studies done on vitamin D?

Georgi Dinkov:
The three or four that I'm going to post, I think the latest one is from 2006, and the oldest one is from the mid-'90s.

Jayton Miller:
Wow, so we've known this for a while.

Georgi Dinkov:
We've known this for a while, yes. And there was something that you may have noticed in the news. Of course, it was immediately labeled a conspiracy. A Japanese group wrote about something called GcMAF, G-C-M-A-F. If you're typing, google GcMAF, and then space cancer. You will immediately find their studies, and of course, a number of articles in the popular press saying, "Oh, this is so experimental. We shouldn't get our hopes high," et cetera, et cetera.

Georgi Dinkov:
Well, this is actually... I think it's another peptide that its synthesis is promoted by vitamin D. The Japanese basically demonstrated that raising... There we go. It is a protein that basically is produced by modification of vitamin D binding proteins. So, when vitamin D binds with one of the proteins in the body, which is specific for vitamin D, a cascade is triggered, and ultimately, the body produces this thing called GcMAF, which stands for GC protein-derived macrophage activating factor.

Georgi Dinkov:
And it basically makes the immune system start to recognize the cancer cells as cells that shouldn't be alive. They should be killed, and the immune system starts to attack them. Now, immunotherapy for cancer is really hot right now. There's a drug called Opdivo, that's the trade name. If you type Opdivo in google you'll see, and it tries to do the exact same thing, but in a very, very toxic way.

Georgi Dinkov:
It's got a number of different nasty side effects, some of which are secondary cancers. So, basically, now it's been promoted for treating metastatic melanoma, and metastatic lung cancer, which both of them are highly lethal. Former President Jimmy Carter was discovered three or four years ago you may have had on the news that he had melanoma spread to his brain. So, he was given Opdivo, and the metastasis disappeared.

Georgi Dinkov:
But basically, Opdivo is the more toxic version of GcMAF. So, vitamin D can trigger the increase in GcMAF, and as the Japanese studies showed, it can actually trigger immediate and full permanent remission, and I think they tried four different cancers, but all of them lethal. Pancreatic, brain, neuro glioblastoma is one of them. I think they also tried melanoma, and I think they also tried lung cancer.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, the Japanese studies said, "Look, by raising GcMAF," and I'm not sure if they did it with vitamin D or by injecting it directly into the animals, they were able to cure a number of these cancers. The studies are out there. They have not been retracted. If you type GcMAF in google, at this point you'll even find links from WebMD and American Cancer Society, which are the bastion of mainstream medicine, and they're saying, "Yeah, looks very promising. Tremendous work. Great, great, great. It's experimental. There's no evidence that it would work in humans."

Georgi Dinkov:
Okay, but it's yet another piece of the puzzle, which points to vitamin D, and again, pro-differentiating factors having to do with metabolism. Having to do with blocking the stress cascade such as estrogen, cortisol, prolactin, serotonin, et cetera. And vitamin D participates in every single one of these. So, to me, it's really not surprising that vitamin D had these pro-differentiating effects in highly aggressive cancer cells that are really not known to be tamable by anything in the lab except directly killing them through cytotoxic therapy.

Georgi Dinkov:
And that's really where most of medicine is still at. You have advanced cancer; you go to the doctor. First thing they will try is surgery, right? If it's a single tumor. If it's already metastatic, they're not going to touch it. They're going to immediately recommend chemotherapy and radiation, and that's about it. And it turns out that mostly suggesting other substance like vitamin that's also chemotherapy, but it looks like there are options out there that are yet to be explored. The knowledge is out there. Has been out there for decades, and hopefully, we'll see more come out of this because the results are very promising.

Georgi Dinkov:
If this was done by a pharmaceutical company... And I actually, I noticed a few studies over the last two, three years. They're trying to develop synthetic versions of vitamin D, and they claim they're doing it because they want to get you the benefits of vitamin D, but without the possible side effects. And they're saying, "Oh, vitamin D can lead to renal calcinosis, accumulation of calcium in the soft tissues, hyperglycemia in the blood," right?

Georgi Dinkov:
But none of these are actually true. It's been shown that the hyperglycemia in the blood especially in blood cancer patients is not due to vitamin D or them ingesting a lot of calcium. It's due to the PTHRP. The rogue PTH-like peptide, which by the way has the same pro-inflammatory effects as PTH, but it's not produced by the parathyroid glands. It's produced by the cancer cell themselves.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, these companies are saying, "Oh, we're going to develop something like vitamin D, but better." And they're saying, "Oh, look. We're doing studies with GcMAF. This thing also raises levels of GcMAF, but without the side effects of vitamin D." So, to me, that is a great sign that medicine is taking this discovery seriously, but they're just trying to cash in on it. They're saying, "We're not going to use the regular vitamin D. That's beneath us," right? "What kind of doctors and researchers are we if we cannot come up with a nice patented drug that will cost $100,000 a month?"

Jayton Miller:
Speaking of new products, do you have any in the works that you're excited about?

Georgi Dinkov:
Two. At least two actually, and one is I already mentioned on the forum. It's called 10-methoxy-harmalan. Basically, you can google it. It will come up, then if you type 10-methoxy-harmalan, harmalan is spelled as H as in Harry, A, R as in right, M as in Mark, A, L as in Larry, A, N as in Nancy. And then 10-methoxy, M-E-T-H-O-X-Y. 10-methoxy-harmalan, right? 10-methoxy-harmalan is one word, and then after it type serotonin, and you'll get a study from the '60s which says that 10-methoxy-harmalan is an extremely potent serotonin antagonist naturally produced in our bodies as a metabolite of melatonin.

Georgi Dinkov:
These early studies opine that the role of methoxy-harmalan is to restrain the effects of elevated serotonin and melatonin, which happens at night, and also happens in a number of psychiatric diseases, especially schizophrenia. So, as you can see, as early as the '60s medicine was already saying, "Hmm, serotonin is not such a good thing." We know it's elevated in schizophrenia. We know it's elevated in depression. We know it's elevated in a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer's.

Georgi Dinkov:
It doesn't seem to be a good thing. We don't know yet, but it doesn't seem to be a good thing, and the body seems to have endogenous mechanisms to counteract excessive serotonin, and synthesis of 10-methoxy-harmalan is one of those. And this chemical is also found in the hallucinogenic herbs consumed in Latin America similar to ayahuasca, I think it's called like that... But in itself, it's only hallucinogenic in extremely high quantities when taken in the isolated form.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I'm going to try working with that same group in Bulgaria that does the studies. They're also chemists. So, we're going to try to synthesize it, and if it's commercially feasible, I'll try to release it. In the meantime, for you listeners who want to try it themselves before that, Sigma-Aldrich which is the largest chemical company in the world, in America, but also, they're international as well, and a number of different other vendors within the United States sell it.

Georgi Dinkov:
It's not a restricted chemical. It doesn't require any special licenses. So, presumably, if people go to these sites and make an account and buy it, there shouldn't be a problem. There's no special requirement to buy, possess, and/or use it. Now, I'm not encouraging that because I'm not a doctor. All I'm saying is that it is a non-schedule, non-controlled chemical that people who want to experiment with can go out there and buy it openly without any restrictions and do whatever they want with it. So, that will be one of the products. The second one is... Oh, do you have a question?

Jayton Miller:
Do you think that would be more effective than cipro for-

Georgi Dinkov:
It should be much more effective because that study in the '60s compared it to LSD and found 10-methoxy-harmalan to be almost as potent as LSD, and LSD is used in microgram quantities while cyproheptadine is used in milligram quantities. And aside from that, cyproheptadine is sedating, sedative because of its histamine blocking effects as well. While 10-methoxy-harmalan seems to be a pure serotonin antagonist.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, in theory, you should be getting, and I'm sure you've seen Ray has written about the antiserotonin beneficial effects of LSD, and the other derivatives such as bromocriptine, lisuride, metergoline, nicergoline. There are at least 20 different derivatives of LSD, non-hallucinogenic ones, and they're in clinic use. Some of them are in clinical use today, but the most potent ones such as LSD and lisuride are used in microgram amounts, and it looks like 10-methoxy-harmalan should be active in those dose ranges as well.

Georgi Dinkov:
I already tried it myself. I bought it from Sigma, and it really does have that potent antiserotonin effect, which includes... If you're under stress and you're retaining water, which is mostly due to estrogen, but also because of prolactin, cortisol, and serotonin. And by the way, serotonin controls the synthesis of all these three hormones. You take an antiserotonic chemical... They were used back in the day. Cyproheptadine was used for edema. It was used for hyper estrogenic conditions.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I took 200 micrograms, which is a fifth of a milligram, and I immediately felt relaxed. Not sleepy. Relaxed. Basically, the intrusive thoughts like repetitive thoughts which is a very good sign that you've been under a lot of stress, that's what serotonin and cortisol do. It's one of the very early stages of deliriums, and the final stage of psychosis. I'm not saying I have that. I'm saying that everybody who's under a lot of stress has probably found themselves in a situation where they have these intrusive thoughts that they can't fight off, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
You keep coming back to that same thing, which usually is whatever it is that annoyed you or traumatized you or got on your nerves. So, those things are immediately gone. I immediately got hungry, which is a sign of blood sugar dropping. Blood sugar rises when you're under stress under influence of cortisol. That's an adaptive effect. It tries to keep your brain alive. The brain consumes mostly sugar, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, what else? The edema disappeared. Other things, basically, whenever I am under stress, I tend to retain water, especially on the trunk. That thing was gone. Other things, so sometimes when I'm under stress and I raise my hand like that, it'll tremble. As you can see now it doesn't. That thing did that as well, removed the tremors, which those tremors are a sign of elevated adrenalin.

Georgi Dinkov:
And so, really a number of different... Oh, my blood pressure also dropped. My normal blood pressure is around 128 to about 78, and when I took that, the 200 micrograms, basically it dropped to 110 to 60. Now that may be a bit too low, but that's actually what the study from the '60s did. That's one of the ways they actually test for antiserotonin effects. They administer serotonin, which is known to raise blood pressure, which should tell you something about the epidemic of blood pressure we're seeing right now given just how many people are under stress and abusing or using SSRI drugs, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, one of the core tests of testing for antiserotonin effects is they administer serotonin, it raises the blood pressure. Then they administer this other chemical, the one that they want to test, and they see if it potentiates the blood pressure effects of serotonin, or if it negates it, right? And there are several others. The serotonin also causes a contraction of the blood vessels, and antiserotonin drugs relax the blood vessels, which also immediately shows you that the whole thing about consuming nitric oxide to do vasodilation, that's really not how it should work.

Georgi Dinkov:
It's actually, if your vessels are constricting and your blood pressure is rising, chances are that serotonin and cortisol or really the stress system are involved. So, you should be fighting that, instead of providing things like nitric oxide, which yes, it will vasodilate you, but it will also cause a systemic inflammatory reaction, which ultimately is known to contribute to a cardiovascular event like ischemic stroke or a heart attack.

Jayton Miller:
Wow. So, do you think that you have to cycle that similar to cyproheptadine or can you take it for a longer amount of time?

Georgi Dinkov:
That I don't know, to be honest with you. The most I've taken is two weeks, but like anything else, I try not to use things on a daily basis just so that you don't get... You don't build your life around a chemical because sometimes the stress and the adaptation to stress is actually good because it's a sign that things need to change in your life, right? But it's only when the stress becomes chronic and inescapable, that's when you need to take care of yourself because then it becomes depression, and it suppresses your thyroid function, suppresses metabolism, and then the actual stress itself at this point... The actual adaptation to the stress becomes pathological when it's chronic and inescapable.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I try to prevent that step from going into the inescapable stress. But stress by itself, if something is stressing you out, if something is annoying you, then the natural state of affairs for the body is to find out why this thing is annoying you, stressing you, pushing your life in the wrong direction, and try to take corrective measures, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, you shouldn't be reaching for the anti-serotonin chemical at the first sign of stress. You should let stress run its course until you start feeling it over the years. I think most people know intuitively when the stress is starting to really wear them down, and when it's still in the stage where it's just stimulating for them to do something. If you're in the stage of the stress stimulating you to do something about it, that's a good sign, you don't want to block that because you take this antiserotonin at that time, then you'll be relaxed again. Then the whole signal from the environment that things are not going in the right direction will be lost.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I think that if you only use it when the stress is about to become chronic and inescapable, which probably shouldn't be... I don't know. Some people have very stressful lives. If you're on average I found that for most people, this doesn't need to be used more than maybe, say twice a week. In that case, I don't think it needs to be cycled.

Georgi Dinkov:
But if you're using it on a daily basis, if your life is in the shambles and it's in such a bad state, if you feel the need to use it daily, then I think adaptation is one of the lower concerns. The bigger concern is what exactly is messing up your life to the point that you need to take something on a daily basis. For those people, I think they should be taken on a daily basis. That or something else that stops the stress, the learned helplessness, to allow them to fight back.

Georgi Dinkov:
And once they've learned to fight back, once they've found an escape, then I think naturally they'll probably just forget about taking if they won't feel the need to take it. You see the whole thing about taking a drug on a chronic basis, that's just something that came out of the drug industry. Of course, they want you as a client for life, and I think so far, I have not seen a person, even when they were using something that made them feel good. I did not see a person who felt the need that they should have taken this on a daily basis forever.

Georgi Dinkov:
One experiment with chronic alcoholics found out... Actually, it wasn't just alcoholics. People with addiction, and that's a study I posted on the forum at least five years ago if not more. It showed that 80% of those people overcome their addiction on their own without the requirement of a pharmacological intervention and/or counseling or other kinds of medical interventions. It's just that if people are able to take control of their own lives, and it sometimes may take a long time, eventually they will overcome it. Whether that's through faith. Whether that's through doing the right things. Changing their environment. Changing maybe the people they associate with. Changing a number of different things.

Georgi Dinkov:
Eventually, they find this... I don't want to call it a balance. They find a new mixture of factors that basically is starting to move their life in the right direction. And at that point, they don't even feel the need to take it. The whole thing about addiction, whether it's to bad things or even good things like... Because medicine says, "Look, you can get addicted both to good and bad things like alcohol or drugs," right? But you can also get addicted to things that make you feel good because it's the dopamine hypothesis.

Georgi Dinkov:
It's been shown that the dopamine hypothesis, yes, you reach out for things that make you feel good, but it's only because your dopamine is low because of high cortisol and high estrogen, and you're looking for ways to raise it. Once dopamine is restored to normal, multiple studies have shown that giving animals or people drugs that increase dopamine further or act like other dopamine agonists, the animals and the people did not want that.

Georgi Dinkov:
Basically, they refused to take it unless you forced them, right? But they have this thing called the preference test in animal studies. They give the animals something that they like, and then they give them free access to it and see if the animals keep abusing it. And that's one of the tests for addiction, right? Well, they found out when the animals are not stressed, when the cortisol goes back to normal, their life goes back to normal, it's called the Rat Park experiment.

Georgi Dinkov:
Basically, the rats stop abusing things, including the highly addictive heroin, which medicine tells you, "Oh, it's a disease. You cannot wean off yourself by yourself. You have to go to a clinic. You have to get these drugs administered. Your life is a complete mess. You need to go to psychiatrist," right? Almost none of that is true. The only part that's true is yes, your life is falling apart and is a mess. But if you find a way to break the learned helplessness cycle, maybe with a bit of an antiserotonin intervention, most people seem to be capable. At least 80% seem to be capable of restoring life's normal balance and moving on with their lives as if nothing happened, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, that automatically means 80% of the drug addiction industry can go right out the window, and life will be better without it, right? Yes, maybe 20% are really in a bad situation, and it usually turns out to be because whatever is contributing to their addiction is still there, right? And some things, unfortunately, cannot be removed in terms of reality such as the death of a loved one, right? Or a loss of a very valuable... I don't want to call it possession, but there's something of very high sentimental value, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
The falling a part of a relationship, things like that, a divorce. Some things, but even those, it turns out that over time, people are able to overcome. If the environment is right for them. If they have a social support. If they're eating a good diet, and if they're not stressed continuously by fearmongering on television and by fearmongering by everything really because life right now is just... If you turn on the TV, it will be very difficult to find the two extremes, which is either, "Oh, the world is falling apart." Or, "Everything's fine. Keep watching this nice show. Things will be good."

Georgi Dinkov:
I don't think either one of these is accurate, but unfortunately, we seem to be more on the side of things are bad right now, and I think basically if people find a way to break out of that somehow remove themselves from this negative environment with a little bit of help of a serotonin antagonist. But even without it, in 80% of the cases, their life should be able to get back to normal.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. Wow. I want to be respectful of your time, so I'll ask one more question if that's all right.

Georgi Dinkov:
Yeah, sure.

Jayton Miller:
What are some of the best ways other than decreasing stress hormones and serotonin that you've done research on or have experienced for brain enhancement or nootropic effects, I guess?

Georgi Dinkov:
Yes, the single most important thing is avoiding routine. It shouldn't become pathological, in other words, that some routine is okay simply because it keeps your life together, right? You wake up in the morning, you eat, right? You interact with your loved ones. You maybe go to the store, maybe take a shower, right? Some of these things are good because at least they give your life structure, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
Now, I don't know of any experiments that have tried to put adults in a completely unstructured environment like kids, right? I mean, think about small kids one or two years old, they pretty much do whatever they want all day, and the adults are just sitting there and trying to prevent them from causing harm, right? From harming themselves. But in terms of structure, there isn't much. The children are free to run around and play and fall and hurt themselves and experiment, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

Georgi Dinkov:
Now, I don't know if this experience has been done with adults, but I think most adults would find that exhausting simply because it requires so much energy to be constantly dealing with new things. But constantly dealing with the same things is actually already known to be highly pathological. The more routinized your life is, the smaller the prefrontal cortex becomes. And it's been shown that even people with Alzheimer's disease, if they got them out of the hospice or they got them out of the retirement home and start taking them to new places, something as simple as putting them in a bus and taking them outside of the city and taking them to a place they've never been before.

Georgi Dinkov:
That alone was enough to restore a good part of the cognition even though temporarily. They slipped right back into it as soon as they put them back in the retirement home. They will lose it for a few hours, and it was treatment for people that were extremely demented. They didn't recognize their own relatives. They had forgotten their own names. They don't know who they were anymore, and these people suddenly woke up as if waking up from a dream and saying, "Oh my God, where I am? Hi, I haven't seen you in a few months."

Georgi Dinkov:
It was really emotional. I think there was a video about it on National Geographic. They show them basically like the relatives that kept showing up for years waiting and hoping to hear their loved ones say their name, none of that happened. And some of these people wake up as if from a dream and say, "Hey, where have you been this whole time?" It was a very emotional episode.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, breaking routine, and often if you see even in a highly routinized life because life is always new, always unpredictable, you will find yourself that if you pay attention, you are exposed to opportunities for novelty all the time. Unfortunately, the culture is such in modern life that we thought that this is a distraction, that we should stay focused. That we should keep pursuing those specific goals, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
Now, there's nothing wrong with goals, but it shouldn't be to the point where you basically... You're like a horse with these covers on the eyes and ears, and basically, that's what the racehorses do so that they're really not distracted. They just keep racing towards the end, and that's all they do, right? That's highly detrimental, and by the way, racehorses have a lifespan of about 40% shorter than horses that are free-roaming and they're allowed to do whatever the heck they want with their lives.

Georgi Dinkov:
That should tell us something because the racehorses, they have the best care... Best care in quotes because it turns out it's really not the best. They get the best veterinary care. They get the best food. They get the best environment, right? But it turns out that something in their life is such that they live about 40% shorter... They have a 40% shorter lifespan than the wild roaming horses. Even horses that are simply used for agricultural work because they tend to have a more free life. They live in the barn, right? Most of the day they walk around, they graze. If they have to do some work, they do, but most of their life is free.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, break in routine, and art is very good for that. Recent studies found out that typing on a keyboard and writing by hand has drastically different effects on the brain. Writing on the keyboard actually did not have any nootropic effects, while writing by hand was similar to the nootropic effects seen in artists that draw. So, there's something about writing by hand. There's something about physical interaction with matter, and I think some of that is also... You're not staring at a screen with blue light all day, right? Because blue light has a very detrimental effect on the brain.

Georgi Dinkov:
But the researchers thought that it was something about the handwriting itself that made this very nootropic. There's a private school in the United States called Montessori, which actually the entire curriculum is based on tactile learning. So, in other words, they want kids to always be touching things and learning by touch, and also by looking. Of course, you're not walking around blindfolded, right? But tactile learning is a core of their curriculum, and it was apparently something that was known as early as 150 years ago when this whole program was being started, the Montessori one.

Georgi Dinkov:
That person without much access to medicine figured out that when people interact with the world directly, physically, it's very good for their brains. It's very good for learning. It's very good for their movement, right? Again, tactile learning, which means drawing. Listening to music is fine, but you should be careful because a lot of the songs now at this point are... I don't want to call it propaganda, but they're very repetitive. Almost everything is being created by machine. The singer just shows up in the studio and maybe sings some of the lyrics, but even that is getting replaced by computer-synthesized voice, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, maybe some of the older songs from the '60s and '70s and maybe even the '80s seem to be pretty good. Painting. Playing a musical instrument yourself is also great. And in general, interacting with people who have an affinity for novelty, which most people do until they get conditioned to be in this hyper-focused target-oriented moment.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, yeah, even without any drugs. Now, of course, raising metabolism in any way is also very, very nootropic, and the example that I always like to give is that there was several large human studies showed that administering people creatine raised their IQ, which was thought to be impossible to raise their IQ. Raised their IQ by I think maybe 12 to 15 points. And keep in mind that the scale for IQ is logarithmic. In other words, increase by 10 to 15 points is actually... You're not just let's say 10 to 15% smarter than the person that doesn't have that increase, you're actually two to three, four times more intelligent because, towards the high end of the scale, a small change in IQ is huge.

Georgi Dinkov:
In other words, Einstein had reportedly an IQ of 145. And then most people that get PhDs have a IQ of about 135 on average, and that doesn't sound like a big difference, 10 points, right? But it's actually huge in terms of absolutely raw intelligence because the scale is logarithmic. So, if creatine, which is known to raise ATP levels or at least serve as a buffer for ATP, in other words, the energy storage molecule. If that can raise your IQ by 10 to 12 points, then to me directly it demonstrates that improving brain metabolism is highly beneficial as a nootropic.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, if you don't want to do drugs, the second-best thing is make sure your brain has sufficient supply of glucose and fructose. Make sure you're not under tremendous stress, right? Because cortisol really shreds your brain similar to what it does to the muscles. It's no different. And then make sure you expose yourself to novelty preferably on a daily basis. Even if it's something as benign as, "Oh, I'm always taking this walk home. I'm walking on this four or five blocks road." Well, take a different route.

Georgi Dinkov:
Something that you haven't seen or haven't done before. Even if it's very minute, it triggers the intuitive mechanism inside the brain, which is what really is responsible for the high intelligence of children, and relatively low intelligence of adults because we lose that sense of intuition as we get older. We think that the analytical knowledge that we've accumulated can replace that, but actually, it cannot.

Georgi Dinkov:
To a degree. So, I'm not saying knowledge is entirely useless, but I think it's very, very overvalued in terms of what it really can do for us. We tend to rely on it too much, and when something that conflicts with our knowledge, something new comes along, we tend to discard it instead of what children do, fully embrace it, and then reconfigure all the knowledge that they have and basically reincorporate it and change their model of the world.

Georgi Dinkov:
Now, that's how really you should be operating, but maybe because of lack of energy primarily as we get older, we're saying, "Oh, all of these things that I learn, and now you're telling me they're not true or they need to be significantly changed. I don't have time for that. I'm not going to do it. I'm just going to ignore what you just told me."

Jayton Miller:
Wow, that's awesome. Do you have some examples in your everyday life where you've sparked novelty?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, first of all, I stopped watching news because I found that the news channels are highly scripted and they don't hide it. They have like every second in broadcasting if it's a very highly watched channel costs millions of dollars. Of course, every second will be fulfilled. Everything will be planned down to the second because they try to squeeze in as much information that are beaming out to you, as much information as possible.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, try to limit TV exposure. You cannot be a complete hermit if you live in the city because it just becomes the other side. The unnatural extreme. You cannot be orthorexic with food right, but also you cannot be indiscriminate either. And I don't want to say the golden mean because that's been overused and I don't believe in that. It's context-specific, but it tends to sit on the side of selectively choosing what you eat every day versus either say, "Oh, I'm not going to eat any of that because all of it is bad or don't worry about it. We've been eating it for 100 years, nothing happened, right? I'm going to be completely indiscriminate."

Georgi Dinkov:
It's more like I have these 10 options. Some of them are not very good, and I know they're not very good. Some of them are less bad. Some of them are maybe even good, right? So, forcing yourself [inaudible 00:56:10] recognizing that you can and you should make an intelligent choice is what actually keeps intelligence going. Being completely shut off from the world saying, "It's all bad, I just can't deal with it." Or saying, "No, everything's fine." Neither one of these seems to lead to good outcomes mostly because I think both behaviors promote routine.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, it's whenever you have to make choices, which leads you to question things and evaluate, that's actually... So, making intelligent choices about food on a daily basis is very, very important. And so, even though eating is routine, in other words, you have to eat two or three times a day, what you eat every day shouldn't be a routine, and if you pay attention to your surroundings, you'll see that every single day you'll probably have different options to choose from. So, trying to take those choices, make those choices, and keep things novel, [novelle 00:57:00], novel, new every day, it's one of the aspects.

Georgi Dinkov:
Another one is just like I said, I walk around town all the time. I don't have a car. It makes no sense to have a car in DC. It's a small town, it's walkable. You have a car you pay a ton for insurance and parking and tickets and whatnot, and you don't even get to use it that much, right? So, I walk around all the time, and I try to take a new path every day. So, when I go to the store, they're like at this point I'm starting to actually... My commute is increasing because I've already walked around all the possible different combinations, right?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, now what I do is I try to find a new store, right? There's a Whole Foods right next to where I live. Well, it's very convenient, but convenience is not always good for you. So, if it's not too much of a hassle, it doesn't mean you have to break your back and walk 10 miles across the city. But if there's another Whole Foods which is let's say a mile away, and then it gives you all of these different blocks and combinations. It gives you an opportunity to take a lot of different routes. And now because of the pandemic and the shutdown, the city's changing a lot.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, even though I may go down the same route, but two buildings are gone. Now they're building something new. So, it's like stay outside. The world is always new. If you're staying too much at home, which I think is the most detrimental part really of the lockdowns through social isolation and routinizing everything about your life. Simply because when you're at home what can you do? There aren't that many things to do in between four walls.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, being outside, making conscious choices about food. Basically, making conscious choices about what you watch and consume on TV and for how long, right? Try to limit screen time as well. If you start feeling... And again, it's not a formula. It doesn't say, "Oh, I'm going to spend two hours in front of the computer every day." That's already a routine. Do your work if you have to do it on the computer. If you start feeling overwhelmed, start feeling bland like things are not interesting anymore, or people around you start to annoy you for no good reason. Behaving the same way as yesterday, but start getting on your nerves. That's a sign you're stressed. You need to break out of that routine and go find and do something new.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. Well, Georgi, I really do appreciate your time on this episode. Where can people find you as far as website, social media, stuff like that?

Georgi Dinkov:
So, I have a blog. Online, I'm known under the moniker Haidut. So, I have a blog called haidut.me. H as in Harry, A-I, D as in dog, U, T as in Tom, don't M-E. So, you go to the blog, and basically, I'm also on Twitter under the same alias Haidut, and it's twitter.com/haidut. And everything I post on the blog, the system is set up in such a way that this takes a little snippet of what I post, the title and a few tags and keywords and dumps it right on Twitter.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, basically, by subscribing to Twitter or following me on Twitter, you also get to see everything that I post on that blog. And I also post on something called the raypeteforum.com. One word, raypeteforum.com, and everything I post on the blog also gets transferred to the forum. And sometimes I participate in discussions on the forum as well, but lately, considering that now I have two jobs and I started to publish studies as well and do actual experimental science, there just isn't much time for me to engage in those discussions.

Georgi Dinkov:
So, it's mostly posting things on my blog and answering emails. If people know my email, they email me, and basically, that's about it. And I post on my blog the studies that I've read other people do, and also lately, the studies that we also do. And if there are any new product announcements, they will also be on the blog. So, that's it. And I also have a supplement company. The company is called IdeaLabs and the website for the supplements is IdeaLabs. It's basically labs for ideas, right? But it's singular idealabsdc as in the state I am, dc.com. And that's about it. That's pretty much my online presence.

Jayton Miller:
Heck, yeah. Well, Georgi, I love your supplements and I love your blog. So, everybody listening, make sure to go check it out. And Georgi, thanks again for coming on, and we'll talk. Until next time.

Georgi Dinkov:
Appreciate it. Thanks for inviting me. Hopefully, it was useful to your listeners.

Jayton Miller:
Yes, sir. Thanks for listening to the podcast. If you haven't already, make sure to hit the like button, subscribe, and leave a comment down below if you want us to cover a different topic.

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