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The Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 7 - The Thermo Mind Part 2

The Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 7 - The Thermo Mind Part 2

In this episode, we answer the remaining questions we got from the facebook group "The Thermo Diet Community Group" about mindset, and how to overcome a lot of the psychological barriers that we all face on a daily basis. Chris ad Jayton give you their thoughts, and tools that they use in order to work through a lot of these challenging things. 

Check it out and let us know what you think in the comments below!

 

Facebook Group and Fanpage -

Thermo Diet Community Group ( https://www.facebook.com/groups/16721... ) - Thermo Diet Fan Page ( https://www.facebook.com/thermodiet/ ) Youtube

Channels: - Christopher Walker ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTA1... ) - UMZU Health ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2IE... )

Instagram: -

@_christopherwalker ( https://www.instagram.com/_christophe... ) - @researchcowboy ( https://www.instagram.com/researchcow... )

Full Transcript:

Christopher W.:
Everyone, welcome back to The Thermo Diet Podcast. My name's Christopher Walker, and I'm here with... I didn't think of a new nickname today, damn it.

Jayton Miller:
Oh, daggone.

Christopher W.:
We got-

Jayton Miller:
Good thing we got a list.

Christopher W.:
Oh, yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Oh.

Christopher W.:
Jayton Miller, aka [Jaytonian 00:00:15].

Jayton Miller:
Ooh.

Christopher W.:
The research sheriff.

Jayton Miller:
I like that one.

Christopher W.:
Wow, there's two in one. What's up, research sheriff?

Jayton Miller:
How's it going?

Christopher W.:
Pretty good, just waking up.

Jayton Miller:
Heck, yeah.

Christopher W.:
A little coffee. We did a episode last week that ended up being really popular called The Thermo Mindset. We just talked about some of the topics in a good, healthy mindset and ended up getting... The certain topics that we talked about actually were generated by the Thermo Diet group on Facebook. Actually, after we recorded it, we got more questions from people that they wanted us to answer, so we're going to do a part two.

Jayton Miller:
Heck, yeah.

Christopher W.:
Same topic but just different subtopics now.

Jayton Miller:
First question, how to gain power over your mind and brain hacks.

Christopher W.:
How to gain power over your mind. What do you think?

Jayton Miller:
Well...

Christopher W.:
Is that the wrong question or... That's kind of what I'm thinking.

Jayton Miller:
No. I mean I think he's mainly looking for focus hacks, stuff like that. Usually, I start off with my research jingle whenever I start my day.

Christopher W.:
You have a research jingle?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. You never heard it?

Christopher W.:
No. Please, please sing it.

Jayton Miller:
Oh. Oh, man.

Jayton Miller:
(singing)

Christopher W.:
All right.

Jayton Miller:
Usually, that gets me in the mood for some research.

Christopher W.:
That sounds more like an R&B single. You know?

Jayton Miller:
It's a...

Christopher W.:
Research Kelly?

Jayton Miller:
What was that? Yeah. I like it, but...

Christopher W.:
All right. Wait. Okay, so you start getting in the mood by singing.

Jayton Miller:
Yes.

Christopher W.:
Singing your jingle. All right.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. It's my research mood.

Christopher W.:
Cool. I need a jingle.

Jayton Miller:
It's good. It gets your juices flowing. No, but seriously, let's see. No, usually what I do is a meditative practice works really well. You even talked about this whenever you read books is just practicing your mindfulness. Usually, what I do is I'll be aware that my mind is typically floating off, and then I'll notice that, and then I'll bring it back. Then, just the more that I practice that, I notice that I can go longer amounts of time without my mind wandering to different topics.

Christopher W.:
It's like anything else. It's just a skill that you practice, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
Paying attention?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, and just really zoning in on what I'm doing. Course, sometimes whenever I get into a really deep conversation with people, it gets a little intense, and they get a little freaked out because I'm focused in on them super close so... because I'm thinking so hard. No, that's usually what I do. Then some coffee and a nicotine toothpick always does me pretty good in the mornings.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Let's see. Yeah, I feel like there's two different questions in this question, right? There was how to gain power over your mind, and then there's brain hacks or focus hacks or whatever. The gain power over your mind is interesting because of... I don't know what... Maybe it's just a non-descriptive question in general, but what I'm reading into that is that people feel like the mind has control over them, and then you want to be able to kind of handle that yourself and feel like you have control over your own thoughts and so forth. Right?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. I don't know where to start on that one. I just think, in general, you always have that control. Then it's maybe a lot of back to what we talked about in the last episode of pulling things out, unpacking assumptions, and then questioning the validity of that assumption. Is this true? Is this worth me basing behaviors off of and thinking patterns off of, or is it just something that I could actually shed right now and not have to worry about it?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Like you're saying, pulling the attention forward and always trying to pay more attention to what you're thinking. It's similar. It's just this skill that you can practice over and over and over, and the more that you do it the better you get at it and then the more that you can think through issues that you're having or conversations that you're having and make your decisions more accurate, which I think is ultimately... That's probably what the control of your mind means. Right?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. One way that I kind of think of it is like taking the third person position like the observation of your thoughts so... and the ability to disconnect emotionally from certain things and view it simply just as it is and kind of holding that thought in your hands and observing it and looking at it in two and, if it's negative, just looking, "Why am I thinking that? What was the root cause of that thought and the manifestation of that thought?" Then, if it was positive, how do I reinforce that thinking process too?

Christopher W.:
Yeah. I think a big thing is reactivity. That's what I thought of when you were saying that is a lot of people just react to things and emotionally. If you don't react, then you are in a much better position of control to your surroundings and the thoughts that are hitting you, whatever. That's a good practice to... probably, the first step in that is to just take... A lot of people don't think before they react. Something will happen or someone will say something to them, and they just immediately fly into it. Right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
If you just took 20 seconds and didn't do anything, don't react, just sit and consider this thing for a second, you're always going to make a better decision than if you didn't. Yeah, it's proactive instead of reactive, right?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. I like it.

Christopher W.:
Then, in terms of focus, focus hacks, I think a deep breathing thing is actually... even if it's only five minutes or even less, can really change your reactivity and increase the focus rather fast like that. If you say, "Oh, I got to sit down. I got to write something," or, "I got to work on a project," or, "I got to start something new or kind of change pace at work," or whatever, if you just sat and did a deep breathing exercise... One of the ones that I talked about in the past on the YouTube channel was the seven-seven-seven. It's a really simple one. It's actually an old Rosicrucian one, just like this... They're very good at controlling their bodies and minds as a practice. The basic way it's done is, essentially, you breathe deeply in for seven seconds. You hold for seven seconds, and then you release for seven seconds, and you do it seven times.

Jayton Miller:
Okay.

Christopher W.:
It's very simple. It's interesting because you find that, probably by the second set of it, you start to get impatient and almost bored. It's like this weird thing. That alone, if you notice that in yourself, it helps with that attention and that mindfulness where you're like, "Why am I so impatient right now? I've been doing this for 60 seconds or less." You know?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
"Now I'm wanting to stop even thought I'm only having to do seven of these." It's just interesting to observe that in yourself. I always get into that second or third one, I'm like, "All right. I'm impatient. I got to stop this. It's only been a minute, and I'm trying to get rid of this." Actually, if you do the whole thing, it really helps you focus so you feel clear and a little more relaxed and that sort of thing.

Christopher W.:
In terms of supplements, Cortigon has been just the go-to. That's a good focus supplement in general. The main ingredient in it is phosphatidylserine. Cortigon actually... Most people don't know this, but that was the first supplement that was made for Truth Nutra.

Jayton Miller:
Really?

Christopher W.:
Yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Okay.

Christopher W.:
Which is now UMZU for the people that haven't been around the whole history of the company. It used to be called Truth Nutra, and Cortigon was our first formula.

Christopher W.:
I initially had heard about phosphatidylserine from a Wall Street trader. He was just raving about it. This is a guy that he... on Wall Street, a bunch of my buddies from college ended up going... That's one of the main jobs that people go to out of Duke is they go to Goldman Sachs or Lehman or whatever. He was raving about it because that whole culture, they have to focus really intensely throughout the trading hours, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
It's a culture of heavy drug use, so a lot of them use cocaine to do that, which makes sense, but that's not healthy, right?

Jayton Miller:
Right.

Christopher W.:
He was raving about it because it was such a healthy alternative. It doesn't feel like cocaine. It's almost the opposite type of a feeling where it's less like... Cocaine gets someone really wired, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
But very focused. Then the phosphatidylserine is this calm focus. It's a calm, clear, healthy focus. It's actually one of the most researched supplement compounds that I've ever seen. It has so much research on it for brain health that it got the FDA-approved health claim, I think back... it was in the '90s about reversing neurodegenerative disease, which is unbelievable that a natural supplement can get a claim like that, but it has enough evidence to actually support that claim in the FDA's eyes which, as everyone knows, they rarely, rarely will approve something like that for a natural compound. Usually, it's saved for drugs that go through clinical trials and that sort of thing.

Jayton Miller:
Phosphatidylserine is the main phospholipid that makes up the cellular membrane in brain tissue, right?

Christopher W.:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jayton Miller:
It's one of the main ones in there, so it kind of helps.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. It's naturally found in everyone's brain, yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
It can deteriorate quickly, yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Right, over time. Replacing it just helps kind of replace what's going away.

Christopher W.:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). It ends up giving you that level of focus that you're looking for without the kind of the speedy nature of other alternatives. It actually has research also supporting hormonal health, which is really cool and a kind of a side benefit to the whole thing. It'll decrease your cortisol significantly and can increase more protective hormones like testosterone and androgens at the same time. It influences the stress to protective ratio in the body in terms of the hormonal health. It's a really awesome supplement. That's why I put it in Cortigon. We've also added a couple other ingredients to Cortigon as well to work synergistically with it. That's why that's kind of the go-to. Also, a lot of people like to use Mucuna.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, that's a good one.

Christopher W.:
Mucuna is a really good one.

Jayton Miller:
Those together is amazing, yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, stack those also with choline.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
If you did the stack like the UMZU stack with Cortigon, choline, and Mucuna, then you're going to be nice and focused. Do a little deep breathing, boom, you're in it.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, and then a little bit of TeaCrine and L-theanine with a cup of coffee, you're in.

Christopher W.:
Yes. Actually, this is probably a good time to mention so we've been working on a new formula that'll be released in January 2020 called... Well, actually, I'm not going to say what it's called because any time we say what stuff's called before we release it, someone rips it off, and so I can't say what it's called, but it's going to be pretty damn cool.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
It's going to be the first thing that you're going to want to take every morning. That's what it's designed for. It's designed to specifically take one capsule with your coffee. The ingredients in it work synergistically with caffeine to actually accentuate the effect. We're pretty excited about it.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. That'll be pretty cool.

Christopher W.:
That'll help your focus.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, but let's see what we got. Mindset. Let's see, another focus question. Tricks to come back to focus when you've lost sight, setting the goal, separating goal into actions, taking small actions to create great change.

Christopher W.:
Okay, so one at a time. Tips to come back into focus when you've lost focus then-

Jayton Miller:
Setting the goal.

Christopher W.:
Setting a goal.

Jayton Miller:
Then separating the goal into actions and then taking small actions to create great change.

Christopher W.:
Cool. Okay, so start with the goal because then it... maybe goal structure or whatever, so setting the goal first, because we do this a lot here at the company, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
What we do is we follow a quarterly system which... If this is more of a personal goal for people, it might help to have a quarterly pattern. I found that quarterly patterns actually... It keeps you really nicely organized because it's only 90 days, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
90 days is enough time to do something significant and make a lot of progress toward a goal or totally achieve it while, at the same time, it's not too far out. A lot of people sometimes will set something way too far out where it's just so abstract that it's hard to get there because it becomes... After 90 days or maybe six months, it becomes really difficult for somebody to clearly visualize all the steps that it's going to take to get there. I've found that, for longer-term goals like that, say a year or 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, it is actually better to get really clear on exactly what you want over that period of time but not necessarily how you're going to get it.

Christopher W.:
It's that almost goes back to that law of attraction type of thing. At least in my experience, any time I've been really clear on the exact thing that I want five years out, I always get there, but I never knew the road that it would take to get there. Then you look back when you actually achieve it, and then you're like, "Wow, I would have never guessed that that's how it would have happened," but it becomes really strange over that period of time. It's like this weird, eerie thing almost where you... When you're in the middle of it, you start to see things come together, and things just come into your life that weren't there a month ago, but then they are facilitating achieving that goal.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
That's where the longer-term things... In my opinion, that's how you should set those. Get super clear on what it is but not necessarily how to do it. In terms of the shorter-term things, you can typically reasonably guess or estimate what you're going to have to do in the next 90 days, in the next six months in order to get closer to that goal, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
What we do here in the company is we set what are known as rocks. That's what we call them, these big immovable rock. It's like, "That's the main thing I'm going to focus on in this 90 days." Then you break it down within that. That's the main thing I'm going to look at, and then I'm going to break it down into... Since it's only 90 days, we got three months. Then I'm going to take those three months, and I'm going to look at what I'm going to focus on in each of those months to achieve it, because you can look at a progression over that period of time and reasonably say, "If I do these three things, I'm going to get that." They're not as big as the rock, but they're still big steps along the way.

Christopher W.:
Then you have four weeks within each month, and you can literally break down like, "This week, I'm going to do this. This week I'm going to do this. This week I'm going to do this. Then, for that month, here's exactly how I'm going to achieve that one thing." You can do it. I mean it's a systematic, very simple thing, easy to plan, not too granular to the point where it's controlling to kind of choke you out, which is important for me personally. I like to have a little bit of flexibility built in there. Some people like to plan every hour of every day, but I don't like that. It's just if I know the one thing I'm going to make sure I get done this week, I'll get it done. Doesn't matter if it's the last second. I'll get it done.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, so that doesn't actually answer the question, though, of how to set the goal. That's more of, in my opinion, how to achieve it. What do you think? Do you have other ideas?

Jayton Miller:
I got two. Usually, whenever I got into my day, I'll have three micro-goals that I wanted to accomplish that day. Then, as long as I accomplish those three things, then it was a successful day. Then everything that I do beyond those three is usually just the icing on the cake, and it just makes you feel that much better, and you feel productive whenever you do that too.

Christopher W.:
For those goals, are you always focused on the highest impact thing for the day?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, so-

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Do you get it done right away, or what do you do?

Jayton Miller:
Usually, just because my mind's freshest in the morning and I can get it done most effectively in the morning. This is why my hours at work are so weird. I found that my brain's fresh from around 6:00 to noon, and then it turns off, and then it turns back on around 6:00 or 7:00 at night til about 10:00. Those are usually my most effective hours in the day. That's why I usually get here around 6:15 and leave around 2:00, because my brain's not working during that time, so I figured why should I work during that time? Then I think-

Christopher W.:
Do you think that's a false thought, though?

Jayton Miller:
What?

Christopher W.:
Do you think the brain not working is something that... Why do you believe that? I'm curious.

Jayton Miller:
I don't necessarily think it stops working, but I just get burned out and my discipline doesn't overtake my motivation, especially on a Wednesday whenever you still got two days left in the week. You've been here for two days during the week, and it's just kind of to get over that hump. Typically, I don't know what it is, but afternoon is just... It's slow. It's kind of boring. I guess I'm most motivated in the mornings to get things accomplished. Then, at night, I'm kind of relaxed to a point to where my brain's more in the creative state, I guess. That's kind of how it works for me.

Jayton Miller:
I also think that it comes back to... In the last podcast, we talked a little bit about obsession for a certain goal. I think that you need to prioritize what goal you want most and work towards it. In a lot of cases, you're not going to have a strategy but just working as hard as you can to accomplish that. I mean that's how I made my way into the office in the first place about a year and a half ago, so-

Christopher W.:
Yeah. We haven't told that story on the podcast yet.

Jayton Miller:
I don't think we have, no.

Christopher W.:
All right. I'll tell the story real quick. Jayton, what was it? Wait. When did you join the company, year and half [crosstalk 00:21:19]-

Jayton Miller:
May of 2018, I think, so about a year and a half ago.

Christopher W.:
Okay.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
A year and a half ago. It was probably two and a half years ago that you first hit me up, right?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
It's probably a year of us back and forth.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, so probably two and a half years ago, I got a message. I don't remember if it was an email or-

Jayton Miller:
It was on Instagram.

Christopher W.:
Instagram or some... Yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Jayton hit me up, but I get a ton of messages on there and then tons of emails and so forth, but... so I just ignored Jayton because why would I think he's any different than any other people that reach out, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
Now, I think it's great that... I'm flattered that people reach out. Don't get me wrong. A lot of people offer to work for the company. A lot of people offer to work for the company for free. It's just it's difficult. Anyone that's built a team before, you know that it's really important that the right people are on the team. It's almost like, financially, there's always going to be the right people are going to make the right impact in the company, right, but then there's a bigger drain if you just let everyone work for free and do all that, so I typically tend to not respond to messages like that, or I'll just say, "Thanks so much. I'll let you know if we have openings," or whatever.

Christopher W.:
Jayton just kept hitting me up. He was like, "Oh, I'm studying biochemistry, and I love this stuff, and I want to work you guys. Can we talk?" and blah, blah, blah. You probably remember more detail about exactly what you were asking, but-

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, so I just remember telling you that I was a student. I'm passionate about this. Whatever you need, I'll do it. It doesn't matter what it is. Then I think I started... I did research and sent you I think it was 14 articles over CBD because you were... it was the universalplant.com. I was writing articles and doing research on those and sending them to you over my Christmas break.

Christopher W.:
Oh, yeah, yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Then we got on the phone that January.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. I remember it. After that, I was like, "This guy is cool. He's just doing this. He's proven himself." It's almost a necessary thing in terms of if you really want to go and work somewhere or learn something, you got to just... You got to want it. It was obvious to me, at that point, that you wanted it whether I would have validated it or not. You were really into it, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
Then I was like, "Well, let's talk on the phone, see if this guy's a wacko. Can he hold a sentence together?" I was in LA. I remember I was at some Loews hotel or something in Hollywood with Greg and Mikey, and so I just... I was like, "Let's talk." We talked on the phone, and I was like, "Oh, this guy's really smart. He can speak, and he's really into this stuff." We just started a project after that, right, so the first project to initiate?

Jayton Miller:
No. You were all like, "Yeah, I think we can talk about a summer internship with you."

Christopher W.:
Oh, okay.

Jayton Miller:
Then I got completely ghosted out until my interview in April with [Carrie 00:24:55], and I was on FaceTime in my dorm.

Christopher W.:
Nice.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, well, then it worked out, right?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, yeah. It worked, yeah.

Christopher W.:
Then you did that internship, and then now here we are.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, but no, so during that internship, it was like you would give me this list of topics and you're saying, "I just want research on all of this." I would spend eight hours a day standing at my desk staring at this computer screen just devouring research constantly.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, you put together a lot of stuff too.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
It was really good, and how to explain my theories about certain things and can you find stuff? I remember at one point where I was like, "All right, with this one, I have a theory. I've seen enough that I think that heart disease is a fake disease that's used as propaganda," which I haven't even talked about much or at all, really, until now.

Jayton Miller:
I know. I'm still working on that one too.

Christopher W.:
I was like, "I really think this is a fake thing." Symptomatically, there are obviously symptoms to it, but it's a symptom... Heart issues are a symptom of other bigger issues. There's a lot of political movement around heart stuff, the Heart Association and all that, so it's just really, really suspicious in my mind. I remember saying that to you, and I was like, "This guy might think I'm nuts, but let's see how this goes." Yeah, and then it's been going great. Now you're responsible for a lot of different things. We went on a good hike the other day and set your KPIs for right now.

Christopher W.:
Just speaking of goal setting, key performance indicators are really important if you want to get really accurate with achieving the goal, the right goal, not missing the mark, so that's what we do here. Yeah, the moral of the story, glad you're here. Now we're doing something really awesome right now, so...

Jayton Miller:
Thank you.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Okay, so how would you set a goal? Let's just answer that last part of the question so...

Jayton Miller:
I think it's just really sitting down and figuring out what's most important to you and utilizing that as a priority.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, so maybe referencing back to that other... the last podcast, part one.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. I think there's a spectrum of goals, at least in my mind, in my life. There's the big one that should facilitate the obsession where it's like, "This is my big goal. This is what I'm going to do." It's got to be big. It's got to be something that's important in your eyes, important enough to orient your life around it and then facilitate an obsession, because that's how you solve big problems, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
That's the kind of goal where you don't have to know how you're going to get it. You just figure it out. That's a good mindset too of... A lot of people, they want someone else to tell them exactly how to get something when it's like, well, if you're going and you're growing and you're going into uncharted territories, then you got to have the mindset of just, "I'm going to figure this out on my own. I don't care what gets in my way. I'm going to figure it out." I love working with people with that mindset because then it's always just like, "Let's just figure it out." It's, "We don't need someone to tell us how to do this. There are no rules here. Let's just fricking do it."

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. I think we had this conversation a while back too is like do you think you're supposed to know the path ahead of you? You said that, if you can see the path ahead of you, then it's most likely not yours. You know?

Christopher W.:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jayton Miller:
That really stuck out to me. I think about that a lot.

Christopher W.:
That's because someone already went down it.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, exactly.

Christopher W.:
Someone already made that path. Then there's other types of goals, though. Those are the big ones, I think, where that is true where it's like, if you set a big enough ambitious goal that is super valuable, usually no one else has done it, that's the kind of thing that's really exciting and can... You can get obsessed about it. The obsession will drive all the problem solving.

Christopher W.:
You'll make tons of mistakes. You got to know that making mistakes is good. I like the idea of failing fast because it's not really failing unless you stop doing, stop trying it. If you just make mistakes fast, then it means that you're not making mistakes slowly by definition. People, if you make mistakes slowly, you end up wasting way too much time, so you got to get really aggressive with action. Sometimes that bold move is a good one in terms of you hit a successful point right away, but sometimes the bold move ends up causing some... It's a minor step back, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
Maybe you run into issues that you didn't foresee, which is always going to happen, and that's totally fine. You just correct course and then keep going. You learn from it. It's part of the process.

Christopher W.:
Then the other types of goals on the spectrum, I think, are... There's always going to be something that you do know how to do, that you've been there before, and there is a path already ahead of you that you can walk down to get to another fork in the road or whatever. There's always going to be these little areas of the journey where you could say like, "All right. Here's my big goal. I know that these tiny things are the parts of this system that I have to go through or build to get that thing." People have done it before, so I'd be an idiot to not learn from their wisdom, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
There's these little paths that you can go down that people have already paved the way for. That's where, also, mentors are really important. Mentorship's a interesting topic because, in the business world and personal development, you hear a lot of talk about getting mentors. In general, if people aren't really into that sort of thing in terms of learning, then it's not a huge thing.

Christopher W.:
We had a conversation about this the other day on the hike about even just college and learning and that sort of stuff. The idea of mentorship's not really that common in those types of environments, which I wish it was in academia. I was telling you about some of the college stuff like it's just not a part of that structure, the education system, and it totally should be. It should be a matter of, if I know I want to learn from a master, I need to go into an apprentice phase.

Christopher W.:
I mentioned the book Mastery by Robert Greene. I think this is a awesome book. I think it's the kind of book that you should reread often, like once a year, as are most of his books should be referenced often. The idea of Mastery and mentorship and apprenticeship are, I think, lost on a lot of people because it's an older idea that, until it becomes in the mass groups of people, until it becomes more common to try to achieve mastery in anything, which most people don't... That's the main problem. Until it becomes something that people want, they want excellence, then it's not going to be as common.

Christopher W.:
The mentorship itself is what's going to... There's two ways to learn, all right? You can learn from your own wisdom that you gain through experience, and you can learn from other people's wisdom that they gain through their experience, which will help you speed up your results, so looking for mentors who have been where you want to go and learning not only the knowledge nuggets but also... I mentioned this last time. It was like kind of look at how they act, how they speak, how they think, how they treat people around them, because those are all the things that they learned through years and years of experience getting where they've been or where they are now. Those are all parts of the equation, the thought patterns and the social interactions with other people and that sort of thing.

Christopher W.:
Then, hopefully, you're picking the right mentors because you don't want to model yourself after somebody who's not a cool person, so that's really important too on getting to your goal. That's going to be what's going to help you get clear on the how, how it's going to happen.

Jayton Miller:
What are your thoughts on, so, failing fast and failing often? I've heard that you never necessarily know how to do it right. It's always going to be wrong. You just know how to do it a little less wrong every time that you fail. What are your thoughts on that?

Christopher W.:
Every time you fail?

Jayton Miller:
Every time you fail, you just learn how to do it a little less wrong for the next time.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. I mean it comes down to I think there are a million ways to get to a goal, so that's probably right, well, unless you have done it before in the modern environment. Say you were going to build a supplement company before the internet. It would be a totally different... The outcome might be the same in terms of your goal. It's like, "I want to build a supplement company to this size," but the tools are different. Therefore, it's a different road.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, I think if you've already went down that road, though, in the exact same environment, then it's a little easier. If you fail, it means you just maybe had a oversight or something, forgot something, whatever, but for the most part, it's... Yeah, it's just like this iterative process. You're failing. Next time, you're going to fail again, absolutely, or you're going to make mistakes always, but it'll be a little less wrong every time and, eventually, you're going to get where you're going to go.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. I've seen a couple funny graphs of certain things of... especially with entrepreneurship or building a company, like the road to success or whatever. These graphs are funny because it's like what people think. It's like this liner thing, and then what really happens is this craziness, but it's always in this upward trend, but it's just this chaos up and down and kind of the ride that goes with it.

Christopher W.:
Oh, one book that I think might be helpful for people that are setting goals that they won't... even if you aren't a business owner or in a business, that this would apply to. It's still good to take the principles from this. It's called Predictable Success. Have you read that book?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-mm (negative).

Christopher W.:
I mean just the idea of it's pretty easy to think about and easy to reference in your head throughout the day or in any situation. It's basically the idea of you have this easy initial success that's the fun phase, and that's where it's like, "Oh, this is great. Wow, this is way easier than I thought." Then you're having fun, and then you hit what's called whitewater. Whitewater is where the rubber hits the road, and that's where most people fail at something or ultimately fail if they don't get through it. That's where a lot of mistakes happen. A lot of people aren't ready for that level of discomfort. They're not that committed to getting it. That's where it's a necessary thing to hit the whitewater because it weeds out the people who aren't worthy of achieving the success.

Christopher W.:
You hit whitewater. That's where all the problems are, but it's a good sign if you look at it with the right mind. It's like, "Okay, I'm in the whitewater now, which means I'm a little closer." You solve all those problems, and you get into this phase of... and you solve them only by really creating systems to overcome it. When you create the system, then you get into the predictable success phase, and now you have predictable success at that level. It might be just a small... it's usually a small level on a... This is a stair step. There's a picture of a stairway.

Christopher W.:
Then, in that predictable success, you have to grow. It's like the grow or die. You're either getting better or you're getting worse. As you start growing again and pushing the boundaries trying to get into new territory, you run into more whitewater. It can get fun again too. It's like, "Oh, this is fun," and then you... but you hit more whitewater. You got to solve it. You got to move into the predictable success again, and then so on and so forth. It's just this endless process. It's a good book. It's a easy way to think about things. I mean you don't even need to read the book. You could probably just take what I just said and just reference it in your head.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. I think another thing is, or at least whenever it comes to work specifically, and I've had this conversation with Zack quite a few times is, if you were to take everything that you're doing right now and were not to get paid for it, would you still be doing it? Both me and Zack have been like, "Well, if I knew that I had food to eat and a place to sleep, then I wouldn't have to get paid no matter what." I think that's a really important thing to think about whenever you have a goal that's going to steer the course of your life is are you going to be doing this regardless of what you get from it? Is this actually something that you want to accomplish whether you're going to hit whitewater or not?

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Say if we lived in this vacuum where money didn't matter, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
Just a thought experiment, act like a physicist and pretend that the world is easy to put in a vacuum, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
Yeah, if money really didn't matter and it was just a matter of value in some other way, yeah, that's a good signal just being like, "Yeah. Hell, yeah. I would still be doing this. I would still be doing it with the same fervor because it's important. It's valuable."

Jayton Miller:
Right.

Christopher W.:
You always have to have the value, but it doesn't necessarily need to be money.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
All right, so the next question is basically a question about stopping self-sabotage that causes us to create a bad lifestyle that matches a level of thinking that is not productive. That's basically what I'm gathering from that, which I think's pretty common for people to... self-worth is an issue for most people where they... it's probably a matter of a lot of self-worth stuff's... It's like other people's thoughts. It's a lot of stuff that we talked about in the last episode about allowing other people to inject their desires and their goals for you and then allowing that into your life where you think like, "Oh, I don't really want this for my life, but now I'm comparing. I'm using the reference point of their expectations of me to measure my self-worth." That's what I think's going on in this.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. Yeah, I think one way to think about that is that, basically, everything that we do is energy. The more energy inputs that you have affecting the energy that you're giving out is going to basically redirect that energy in some way, if that makes sense.

Christopher W.:
I think, to answer this, it's probably just helpful for this person to listen to the last episode in general. Stop putting the reference point on someone else's expectation of you. Stop wasting your energy thinking about that. Start focusing on exactly what you want. Get real clear on your goal, your exact chief aim. That's actually what Napoleon Hill calls your definite chief aim, right?

Jayton Miller:
Okay.

Christopher W.:
Identifying exactly who you are, what you're going to do, which takes a lot of work. You don't just materialize that out of thin air. It takes a lot of work. Have you read the book The Laws of Success or The Law of Success?

Jayton Miller:
No.

Christopher W.:
It's a awesome book. Think and Grow Rich is Napoleon Hill's famous book, but The Law of Success is better. It's way more detailed. It's a lot of similar principles, but it's just extremely thorough in terms of that. The first law, the first part of the law is just identifying your definite chief aim. When you have that in your head, just like it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks. That's your thing. Then you start to raise your own habits and your own thoughts to that, and you stop wasting time on other people's stuff. It becomes a lot harder to self-sabotage if you're like, "This is what I'm doing. I'm not letting anyone else negatively influence that. I'm going to do it."

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. I experienced that recently whenever I went to Italy because it was the first time that I was traveling abroad. I got some hard resistance from family members who were simply just scared. They didn't know what was going to happen to me or what was happening over there. They were constantly just so like, "Man, I don't know if you should be doing this. I don't think it's safe," all of these things. I was like, "I really don't care. I'm going to do this no matter what." I ended up going, and I had a great time, so I mean it's pretty sweet.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Ultimately, you got to make your own mistakes. You got to make your own decision, make your own mistakes. You learn from it. That was what I felt with my tumor issue back when I was 19. Being a little bit bullheaded like that is definitely an asset if you're not an idiot. If you can make bullheaded decisions to push you forward to exactly what you want but do it in a way that's not stupid... Say you weren't going to Italy, but you're trying to go to Syria or something. That might be a different story just if you're going to a place where it might not be the smartest place to go to.

Christopher W.:
With the tumor issue, the doctors were just telling me, "Hey, you should get the surgery or you should just be on these meds for the rest of your life," but bullheaded decision being like, "That doesn't make any sense to me. I don't want to choose those option. I'm going to choose my own option." I got resistance from that, but it didn't matter in the end. It ended up making my life infinitely better. Now it's making tens or hundreds of thousands of other people's lives infinitely better too. There's some level of wisdom in making your own decisions even if it seems bullheaded and just sticking with it, but you got to be ready to make your own mistakes too and own the responsibility for those mistakes.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. I think a lot of people have trouble knowing or trusting their gut, knowing which decisions are actually theirs in a lot of cases too. A lot of the times, they'll take weight from other people's decisions and kind of view those as themselves because they think about it often and a lot rather than actually defining what is actually theirs. Does that make sense?

Christopher W.:
Yeah, yeah. That goes back to the idea of the Liminal Thinking that we were talking about last time. You got to surface that stuff, make subliminal things or assumptions or subconscious thoughts or whatever, however you want to call it, make it liminal. Make it conscious. Figure out for yourself whether that's your thought that you're going to accept or whether it's someone else's. Most of the thoughts in our head are someone else's because we just get barraged by other people's thoughts all the time.

Jayton Miller:
Constantly.

Christopher W.:
Yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
You just got to surface it. Accept it, reject it, whatever, but it's your choice, and it's your responsibility, ultimately, to do that type of work. It is work. It's a skill, takes practice. It's a lifelong pursuit, but you got to do it or else you're just going to get stuck.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely, yeah. Let's see what we got next. Let's see. We did yo-yo dieting last week, didn't we? We kind of covered that one.

Christopher W.:
Did we?

Jayton Miller:
I think so.

Christopher W.:
What's the question?

Jayton Miller:
"What do you do if you have been yo-yo dieting and calorie cutting for a long time and doing long-term Snake Diet fasts and digestion is jacked up and metabolism is jacked up and maintenance calories need to be 3,200 to sustain weight in order to fix everything and get back on track? You just start eating 3,200 per day if you've been doing OMAD and only eating 1,500 calories per day? You already told me what to do from 3,200 calorie point and not to stress the system. I'm just wondering how do I go from 1,500 calories to the maintenance 3,200 calories without putting on a ton of weight and getting in worse shape and adding stress? You discussed it in the answer you've given me before. Thanks. I hope I conveyed it in a way that makes sense."

Christopher W.:
Yeah, so I mean it's a good question. It's not necessarily a mindset thing, but maybe we can answer this. A lot of people come to Thermo in a damaged state, metabolically damaged, right?

Jayton Miller:
Very.

Christopher W.:
The idea of Thermo, in general, is to increase your metabolic rate, increase the energy flow through the body and repair the damage.

Jayton Miller:
Right.

Christopher W.:
Right. This is a pertinent question, just in general, about that transition period for a lot of people because there is also a lot of fear in people's heads about the... like what he mentioned about if, say, he was coming off of a keto thing, metabolic damage. How do I make this transition without gaining a ton of weight? That's a good question.

Christopher W.:
What we typically have advised is you want to go to maintenance calories and repair your thyroid and your hormones in general by... and stick to thermo foods. Don't eat PUFAs. Just stick to that stuff because it will increase your metabolic rate, and it will do it pretty rapidly. The thing is that I think the fear with the weight gain is actually not... It's kind of unfounded if you do it right. There's a couple ways to go. If you went straight up... I mean 1,500 calories a day. That's a big swing, but...

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. My first thought would be, first of all, no male should be under 1,800 calories in any circumstance, in my opinion. I think that [crosstalk 00:49:25]-

Christopher W.:
Yeah, unless maybe you're like...

Jayton Miller:
Tiny.

Christopher W.:
Tiny, tiny.

Jayton Miller:
Tiny, tiny.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Well, most people aren't tiny.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah.

Jayton Miller:
I would say the most successful way I can see this happening is bump it up to 2,000 calories. Stay there for about a week and then add in 100 calories every week from there up until maintenance, and then sustain maintenance for quite a while.

Christopher W.:
Yeah, that-

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. They should be able to go even faster than that, usually, but the idea, I think, is right on, spot on with a progression upward if they're afraid of just going straight to the maintenance.

Jayton Miller:
Right.

Christopher W.:
The thing too is that I think people worry a little bit too much about super short-term stuff like, "Oh, tomorrow morning, if I wake up and I look a little puffier than I did yesterday, then I'm going to freak out and whatever," and then that sends them down some binge hole or whatever they're going to do back and forth, back and forth.

Jayton Miller:
Right. This is why we don't weigh ourselves in the Thermo 30 Jump Start Guide.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. It helps to just do something and stick with it and build momentum behind it. The thing too, though, is I have a friend here in Boulder, and he's also a business owner. He's a professional. He's a very good skeptic, very intelligent person, very skeptical about a lot of things, came from keto and started Thermo and was worried about some similar things, which I think is a standard worry in that scenario. It was like, "If you're conditioned to think, 'Oh, carbs are going to make me fat,' then, by instantly switching to eating a lot of carbs from thermo sources, you naturally are going to assume that you're going to gain a lot of weight."

Christopher W.:
Well, I can use his example, and now he's just a huge Thermo advocate, it's awesome, where he was worried about that, but then when he did Thermo correctly with the right sources, really eating no added PUFA at all, he ended up dropping weight very rapidly. He emailed me the other day. He's down to the same belt size that he was, waist size that he was when he was 30.

Jayton Miller:
Dang.

Christopher W.:
He's in his mid 40s now. The impact there has just been awesome on his life. Don't always assume that, just by making that switch to eating the carbs and the increase in the calories, that you're instantly going to gain that weight, because it's also... It's very difficult to super accurately measure what your current resting metabolic rate is. I think a lot of people overestimate the depth that their current rate is at, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
This person might be thinking it's at 1,500 calories. It probably isn't. That's a severe damage. It's going to increase pretty rapidly with these thermo foods.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely, yeah. I think that's pretty good.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Hopefully, that answers the question. I left an answer too of maybe also going into just a small deficit. In general, I like to tell people to just do a small deficit of 10 to 20%, in general, but he needs to get back to maintenance, so I think your recommendation is good too just if wants to do that, steadily increase up to maintenance and stay there for a while.

Christopher W.:
Also, one thing that's really helpful for people is to stop... especially to stop obsessing over intake, food intake stuff. It's just to get to maintenance where you feel extremely satisfied. Especially with Thermo, all your cravings do go away if you're eating the right stuff, a lot of nutrient... If you're having a daily smoothie and then a Thermo bowl, within two weeks, your cravings are gone. It makes life so much easier at that point. What I would recommend is getting into a pattern like that and then increasing your activity level in a way that's not going to increase your appetite.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, like that.

Christopher W.:
Hiking, walking.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, non-exercise energy expenditure. NEAT, right?

Christopher W.:
Yeah, NEAT being non-exercise but then increase your activity while eating in a way that's going to leave you satisfied because you're not craving anything. That's actually an amazing way to start dropping the weight again because you're fully supporting your nutrient needs on a daily basis and your caloric needs, and then you're just being active in a rejunvenative way. Do some weight training three times a week and get your 10K steps a day. It's really that simple. Just make it a habit. If you want to do something else, maybe go up to 15K steps in a day if you're feeling really ambitious, or get bigger walking days and then normal ones.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, definitely. Yeah. I think another thing is steer away from the one meal a day. Up your food frequency. The Snake Diet's... I mean I haven't seen this guy that talks about the Snake Diet, but I've heard some really bizarre stuff about that, so-

Christopher W.:
What is it exactly? I keep hearing people on YouTube always reference Snake Diet, so-

Jayton Miller:
I know. I've heard a few different things. I've heard it's eating maybe a giant meal once a week or every three days.

Christopher W.:
What? Once a week.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, like crazy stuff.

Christopher W.:
Wait. That's it? That's the only thing they eat?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, just one giant meal every three days or every week or something like that, or it's the OMAD, which is the one meal a day, which can be effective in some cases, but I think if your metabolic rate is damaged and you're not in a healthy metabolism, then that is the opposite of what you need to do, in my opinion.

Christopher W.:
I think a lot of it comes to... which is relevant in the Thermo mind type of topics, but it comes down to mindset and finding a pattern that's something that you can build momentum with and be enjoyable. For most people, they're approaching a one meal a day type of thing in a sense of restriction. You're always going to get into some weird situations if you're trying to compensate for something else and then basing your behaviors around that.

Christopher W.:
If you were to just say, "I'm going to eat two or three times a day," or four or five or whatever it's going to be but have your caloric intake, make it right and focus on nutrient density and focus on building good habits and that sort of thing and making it enjoyable for yourself, which is what we talked about on the last episode of... If people that feel that these... if they have to track every single calorie and macro and whatever and they don't feel committed to it, it's like, well, find a different goal. Find something else that you're going to enjoy, like another goal being, "I want an enjoyable life on a daily basis that I don't really have to think much about food, but I'm fulling supporting the health of my body," then that's a great goal. That's a goal that works for most people, so then just get in to that habit.

Christopher W.:
Whether it's one meal a day or five times a day, it doesn't matter to you because you're just in this momentum in this world, that it's way more enjoyable than a restrictive world where you're thinking all day about your one meal that you're going to eat at the end of the day, and then you end up using it as a binge fest, which a lot of people do, and it's not a great meal. Then they go back into the... It's a binge-purge cycle like this restricted fasting into one meal. It's, in my opinion, just back to a mindset. You can approach it in a healthy way. You can approach it in a unhealthy way.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, and I think if you're going to go by feel, make sure that you know the difference between actual physical hunger and psychological hunger, because I noticed that, back whenever I was in probably... I had a really bad relationship with food for a while. I couldn't tell the difference between actually being hungry and the fact that I thought I was hungry or that I thought I should be eating or that I thought I wanted certain food. I think that's another thing to pay attention to.

Christopher W.:
That probably goes back to the stuff we were talking about earlier was other people's thoughts, because I used to have probably a bad... yeah, just little more of a pathological thing like that. I remember, specifically, I would think about what I was supposed to do as though... That's indicative of someone else's thought, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
"Oh, I'm supposed to do this this way." Then you feel this pressure, and then you're always thinking about it. That's where that psychological hunger kind of takes over because you're convincing yourself you have to eat right now or you have to wait to eat or whatever. It's about finding that pattern that you're going to enjoy, in my opinion.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, definitely. You want the next question?

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Let's do one more, and then we'll wrap up this episode. I think, with that sort of stuff, we can unpack that a little deeper, that emotional eating stuff, in a future episode.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Because we've had requests for that, so...

Jayton Miller:
Definitely, yeah. If you all have any requests, make sure to post them in the Facebook group and tag us in them, and we'll touch on them in these podcasts.

Jayton Miller:
All right, so the next question, the psychology of saying no to friends and coworkers when they offer food that's not in Thermo guidelines and how to present Thermo principles in a way that's comprehended easily.

Christopher W.:
Okay, so let's say at the office, so someone's office, someone brings in a bunch of doughnuts or something. Is that a common thing? That's probably a common thing, right?

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, I think so, doughnuts, cupcakes.

Christopher W.:
Cupcakes, whatever. Let me think. What I would do, I would just be like, "No, thanks."

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
I don't know if it gets much more complicated than that. Maybe he's just overthinking it, but maybe people are putting the pressure on like, "What do you mean, 'No, thanks'? These are Voodoo Doughnuts. These are the best doughnuts ever. They got a little zombie on them."

Jayton Miller:
And bacon.

Christopher W.:
And bacon and maple. It's like, "No, thanks. Right now, it's just not really in line with my goals."

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
People are going to try to push on you because they feel bad about it. If you don't do it, they're going to feel bad about themself. That's something to realize, I think, if you're in a situation like that. It's not your problem. It's theirs.

Jayton Miller:
We talked about that a little bit in the last episode too, people projecting their insecurities onto you. I think one way to think about this is that... and this can be an easy way to explain Thermo is that you're eating in a way that's supporting your body and supporting your health. Whenever you support your body and your health, you're going to be supporting your mind. Basically, that overflows into all areas of your life. If you're going to eat a doughnut or something, you're just taking a step away from eating in a metabolically-supportive way.

Christopher W.:
Yeah. Well, one thing you could do, because the thing is if the main resistance is the other person being insecure about the choice, one thing you could do is be proactive about it and say, "It's not really in line with my goals. I'm actually working on a specific way of eating to increase my metabolism right now or to heal my thyroid. My thyroid's been a bit imbalanced. I'm working on a way to heal my thyroid right now, so I just need to make some specific choices."

Christopher W.:
You could use it as an opportunity to tell them about Thermo in a positive way. Instead of something that's going to threaten their ego, just be like, "Hey, I'm working on this for myself." Say it genuinely in a way that's potentially going to intrigue them to be curious about learning about it, right?

Jayton Miller:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher W.:
Because he was also asking about how to present Thermo in a productive way like that. If you can be like, "Hey, I got some Voodoo Doughnuts. You want one?" say, "No. No, thanks. I'm actually healing my thyroid right now with my nutrition choices, so I'll hold off on that. Thanks, though." You might be like, "Well, wait. How you doing that? I got thyroid problems too." Be like, "Oh, yeah. Thermo. Check out Thermo. Go to thermodiet.com and read about it. Join the Facebook group. I'm in this awesome Facebook group. You can learn. You don't have to commit to it right away. Just get in the Facebook group and check it out, learn from people. Since I've been doing this, I feel so good that I want to stay on that path because I'm feeling so good."

Christopher W.:
Just make it positive instead of making it about threatening their ego, which is what... You never intended to make it about that, but that's what they're going to take it as. Just don't make it about that. Make it about, "Hey, it's this awesome thing that I'm just feeling so good I don't really want to stop doing it." Then they're going to naturally be curious about it, and then it's easy to talk about.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. The first few episodes of this podcast, too, would be a great resource to send them to. They don't even have to request to become a member of it. They can just listen to it. I think that would be a good one, or you can just smack it out of their hand and tell them that "That ain't Thermo."

Christopher W.:
Yeah. That's another option. Do the, "That ain't Thermo."

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. That might not go over well, so...

Christopher W.:
No, it depends on what kind of mood you're in, what you're willing to go up against and...

Jayton Miller:
Oh, but-

Christopher W.:
Okay, so yeah, that's probably about it for this episode. I think we got to wrap it up, get on with our work day here. Hope you're liking the episodes. If you have requests for future episodes, we really want to just design this podcast to be helpful to you, the listener. We will obviously have ideas of our own, stuff we want to talk about, topics, but we want the bulk of these episodes to be your ideas because, that way, we can ensure that this is a ultimately perpetually helpful show. Get in the Facebook group if you're not already and just leave us requests. We'll pick the good ones.

Jayton Miller:
Heck, yeah, definitely. How's the website coming along? It's going to be launching pretty quick, isn't it?

Christopher W.:
This week, yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
That's what we got to meet about right now, all the... tie up the loose ends. Then we also, if you're watching on video, we've got a Barnana organic plantain chip bag sitting here on the table for a reason. Just 2020 January, we're going to be launching, on thermodiet.com, what's called the Thermo Market. Thermo Market's going to be really awesome. I'm so stoked about it because we're forming these relationships with all these Thermo-approved food companies, or not necessarily the companies being Thermo-approved, but they have products that are Thermo-approved. We're going to source the products from them and have them all available for you on the Thermo Market so you can easily just go and get Thermo-approved snacks or sauces or foods or whatever, cooking stuff.

Christopher W.:
It's easy to find. We're going to make this very convenient for you. You could subscribe to snack boxes and fun stuff like that. We got a big plan for it over the next few years to build it into this awesome market place, eventually have it so that you can buy grass-fed meats, all sorts of good stuff. It's a ambitious project, and we're pretty stoked about it. It's going to be launching in 2020 January with the first handful of stuff. We've already got Barnana who... They've been awesome to work with. They're super stoked about it. We've got Epic, so Epic Bars. We're going to have Liver Bites and a couple certain Thermo-approved Epic Bars on there. What else? There was...

Jayton Miller:
Brownie batter.

Christopher W.:
The brownie, the Thermo brownie batter. That's a big one. Jake found that one.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Siete chips.

Jayton Miller:
Siete is on there, yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yep. Yeah, we'll have good... Oh, Schmidt's too. We're getting some Schmidt's stuff.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, for the deodorant and stuff like that.

Christopher W.:
For personal care items.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah.

Christopher W.:
Yep.

Jayton Miller:
We're waiting to hear back from them.

Christopher W.:
Yep. We've got this stuff in the works and just want to let you guys know about it. Go over, check out thermodiet.com. If you're listening to this in real time, it'll be up this week, the new website update. Check it out. The new quiz, actually, the body type quiz, is super accurate, really cool. Spent a lot of time making sure that it was super helpful and accurate in the diagnosis of the Thermo body types, so some good tips in there. There'll be some additions into the action plans in the course itself.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. Get into the Facebook group. I can guarantee you, if you go in there and you post a question, it'll be answered within an hour or less, without a doubt, from somebody who knows exactly what they're talking about. Get in there and ask your questions.

Christopher W.:
Cool. All right. Thanks for listening. Subscribe wherever you're listening at. It might be on Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, Stitcher, Player FM, Google Play. I think it's in a bunch of places right now, so wherever you're listening to this, subscribe to it. If you didn't know it was on Spotify or iTunes or whatever, go check it out too.

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