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The Thermo Diet Podcast Quarantine Edition Episode 36 - Danny Roddy

The Thermo Diet Podcast Quarantine Edition Episode 36 - Danny Roddy

 

In this episode of The Thermo Diet Podcast Jayton Miller sits down with Danny Roddy, otherwise known as the Peat whisperer. Jayton and Danny talk about some ideas about serotonin receptors and our perceived reality, baldness and some of the best tips to help prevent it along with growing hair more effectively, and more! Check it out and let us know what you think!

 

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Full Transcript

Jayton Miller:
Welcome back to the Thermo Diet Podcast. I'm your host, Jayton Miller. And I'm here with the one and only, Danny Roddy. How are you doing, Danny?

Danny Roddy:
Good. How are you?

Jayton Miller:
Doing well. So for those listeners who don't know who you are or might not know who you are, could you give them a little bit of background?

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. I think the elevator pitch would be that I'm the apprentice that Ray Peat never wanted. I'm skipping over a lot, but I encountered Ray's work and was just totally fascinated with it. So I consider myself like a student of his. I'm sure people probably know who Ray Peat is listening to this, but I consider him somebody that's so far ahead of everybody. Not only about nutrition, but I'm interested in his philosophical views and things like that. That's where I am now, but I have a long journey of how I got here.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. So you have all kinds of work on hair loss and neurotransmitters and all kinds of things, which I want to dive into. One of the first things that I've been dying to ask you about is your article on LSD. So can you give us some explanation for how you perceive the serotonin receptors being the filter for which the reality that we're actually able to take in?

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. I think that was something Aldous Huxley said. He said there's like a, what do you call it, a release valve or something. So to live in this world, you needed to have some kind of filter that filtered out a lot of things in your general perception or whatever. And that LSD and other drugs are released to that filter. So that idea, I just have a very topical understanding of it, but the idea that serotonin is not the happy hormone, it's actually a substance that increases in aging in general. and then it's also responsible for a rigid attitude.

Danny Roddy:
So I consider myself as somebody who throughout my lifetime was extremely rigid. Always needing somebody to bow down to my thought process and trying to dominate other people intellectually and things like that. So when Ray was saying that that rigid authoritarian behavior was not only wrong in a philosophical way, but it was also like a physiological problem as well. And that largely related to the bowel because that's where I think Constance R. Martin in her Endocrine Physiology book in 1985 said that 98% of the serotonin is produced, I think in the bowel. I think that was the exact quote.

Danny Roddy:
So that was something that was interesting, and then tying in what you had mentioned earlier, just about my interest in hair loss, serotonin apparently increases cortisol and prolactin and it just like this central piece in this big biochemical web of things that happen in stress and aging. So it seems pretty important to understand it. It turns out that LSD is apparently one of those things that lowers serotonin.

Danny Roddy:
So I don't know how far deep you want to get into that, but I think I've only done LSD a few times, like real LSD and it's like, I think opening up and seeing things from different points of view and things like that is kind of the MO of that drug. I think you can do different dietary things like keeping the intestine clean and taking thyroid and aspirin and eating good nutrition. I think those things can... Not to the degree that LSD can, but definitely open you up to new possibilities and look at things in a less rigid way.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. And I think that that kind of has like a reciprocating relationship because the better that you feel in your body, the more energy that you're going to be able to reduce to produce with that higher... Like be able to handle that higher stimulus that's coming in.

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. The energy and structure is interdependent at every level of the race thesis. Yeah, exactly.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. So one of the things that I was thinking about is in hypothyroidism, unsuspected illness. Broda Barnes talks about whenever he was at a motel and there was this young girl who was hearing voices, and he actually tested her thyroid and it was low and he administered her thyroid therapy and the voices went away. And then she deviated from the therapy, the voices came back, she got back on and they went away. So do you think that there is a relationship between thyroid hormone and serotonin? And do you think that they're almost a direct relationship?

Danny Roddy:
Ray has written about this and I have accumulated his references when he talks about this, but I think carbon dioxide is one of the major antagonists to serotonin because I think the platelets and the mass cells, which contain serotonin become leaky when the pH has changed and that's mediated by carbon dioxide. So the platelets, I hope I don't screw this up, but I think there are carrying the serotonin from the intestine and they carry a ridiculous amount of serotonin and they become leaky and release their serotonin into the blood.

Danny Roddy:
Then there are other things that activate like tryptophan hydroxylase, which turns tryptophan into serotonin. And all these things are part of the big stress system. I don't even remember that part in the book that you're talking about, but that is interesting. I've never studied anything like that.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. It's quite fascinating. I was blown away whenever I thought about it. It wasn't too far after I was reading your LSD article too. So it kind of just clicked whenever I was reading it. So there is a clear connection between serotonin and hair loss. Can you walk us through how that works?

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. So I don't think there's any like paper that's that studied it, but I think again, if cortisol is elevated in pattern baldness, and I think there is... Again, this area is completely understudied and so we're kind of like grasping at straws here. I think my main position would be like, "Hey look, the genetic androgen hypothesis, we've had how many decades of this theory and it's produced drugs like finasteride and minoxidil, and to a lesser extent Nizoral. This thing is like a total failure in my opinion.

Danny Roddy:
There's some like ideal ideological commitment to this point of view that people just want to... Maybe they're taking a drug and they're crossing their fingers and they're really hoping it works or whatever. It's like their only chance. But I think it clouds the judgment of thinking about it in a new way or tackling the problem from just like a different angle.

Danny Roddy:
So that's what I tried to do in my... I wrote a book in like 2013 and I tried to go through how the theory was concretized and how it came to be, and it's like really flimsy. You were asking about serotonin and cortisol and prolactin. So I guess if you find these intermittent papers that talk about elevated prolactin in so-called female androgenic alopecia, and then male androgenic alopecia so-called, and then you find prolactin and there's a few papers that talk about that being elevated.

Danny Roddy:
I did a livestream on the hyperadrenalism of pattern baldness. So this is something that's been kind of well studied. Not well studied, but there are more than one or two papers on it. So young men tend to have very high DHEA levels and apparently DHEA rises to meet cortisol during a stressful event. And this is a protective thing that DHEA does, but over a prolonged period of time the certain layers of your adrenal glands deteriorate, and then you're left with just cortisol and not enough DHEA.

Danny Roddy:
So again, I think a circumstantial evidence is that the right way to do it, let's say it because I don't think it has been investigated enough to say it like totally positive because it's just never been studied in my knowledge. But I wouldn't be surprised at all if that it is central. And also for what it's worth, I've talked to hundreds of people losing their hair and digestive symptoms seems so prevalent from constipation, to diarrhea, to the chronic gas.

Danny Roddy:
It's always a constellation of things. It's never like, "Oh, I'm losing my hair and I have zero problems otherwise." I mean, I have a small sample size that specifically resonates with the message that I have, but it's never been a Skype that I've ever had with anybody.

Jayton Miller:
Interesting. So do you know what is actually happening at the hair follicle whenever those stress hormones are high? What is it combating and what actually makes it stop the hair from growing?

Danny Roddy:
So this is tricky. So I think the hair follicle goes through those different growth phases like the anagen, catagen, and then telogen. I should have read up on this. But anyways, I think the anagen phase can go for really long periods of time. So there's no limit to how long the anagen can grow. And I found one paper that said the anagen stops and it shifts into the telogen. And some people call that like the resting state of the hair follicle. And this paper was like, "No, it should be more considered like a recuperating from damage phase of the hair follicle."

Danny Roddy:
So the important thing to remember with so-called male pattern baldness is that I think that outstanding symptom is like a higher proportion of hairs are in the telogen, so-called resting phase than the anagen phase. And then it's characterized by that horseshoe shape.

Danny Roddy:
I think all of that stuff is really explainable in the bioenergetic model. We can talk about the mass cells that are outlining the shape of the pattern baldness. But long story short, I think you need enough of those things that Ray is talking about, the thyroid, the good nutrition, the vitamins and minerals. You need the pregnenolone, progesterone, DHEA, because the hair fall going... I'm no expert, but I think it's characterized by rapid cell division. So like a glycolytic really quick metabolism dying with the melanocytes and melanism. Melanism, is that the right word?

Danny Roddy:
Anyway so the dying of the hair follicle. Then I think it's that prolong differentiation phase of just growing that keratin into the hair follicle. It's a highly proliferative growing tissue and I think it's sensitive to damage. So there was a paper in 2012 by Garza, et al and they found that they did biopsies in men's scalps and they found that prostaglandin D2 was elevated in the scalps of balding men. Prostaglandin is of course are these like subs... No. There are products from arachidonic acid which is some people consider an essential polyunsaturated fat and then linoleic acid via conversion of liver is majorly turned into arachidonic acid.

Danny Roddy:
Anyways, I thought that paper not only helped explain what was happening on the scalp and to the hair follicle, like the hair follicle is being de-energized and then probably miniaturized over time, and can't go through its full growth cycle, but also... Oh, I totally forgot what I was going to say. The one other thing I wanted to throw in here on my long diatribe was I think the heat from the brain might be involved.

Danny Roddy:
And I know that's kind of crazy, but the melanin, I think protects the hair follicle and it turns out that just high temperature can promote the synthesis of melanin. So, yeah, we can get into that, but I think the question that nobody really asks about hair loss, it's like what's the function of hair? And I'm not ready to answer that, but I think insulation might be a good starting place. And I think that would implicate the brain as having some kind of a role in pattern baldness.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. Now, do you think that one of the causes would be like a decreased amount of circulation to the brain specifically lowering the core temperature of the brain?

Danny Roddy:
That's a great question. I think that's reasonable. I don't know if you saw the last live stream. I was presenting that question to Ray and he was always trying to expand it saying how I think complex everything is. I think he does that on purpose to stimulate the person's own learning and things. So again, I don't... This is so understudied and there are no papers that measure over the course of the day a balding man's scalp to see the temperature changes and things like that. But I wouldn't be surprised if that were involved.

Danny Roddy:
But again it's a systemic issue. I would always be remiss if I didn't point out that it's like a systemic whole body issue. I don't know if you saw the video, but I made one talking about like hypertension and things, and that has an effect on the brain causing like a brain atrophy and things like that. So again, it's interesting to talk about and speculate, but I don't think we could say anything concrete. But it definitely makes sense to me at this moment given my limited understanding of things.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. So you mentioned the horseshoe shape of male pattern baldness baldness and it's synergistic with neonatal pattern baldness. So can you give the similarities there and why that's persistent?

Danny Roddy:
So the neonatal pattern baldness is something that I think like really cast doubt on the genetic androgen hypothesis because it just doesn't really fit in with that. What is it, the baby's genes causing the hair follicles to self-destruct in a pattern shape and then they're recuperating. Their defective genes are now good again. And then the androgen... To me, the genetic androgen model is just really not explanatory.

Danny Roddy:
So I don't actually have a really solid answer for the neonatal pattern baldness, but I have some papers that talk about neonates having something called the witch's milk, which is like, they can actually milk themselves when they're born. And that's because of their sky high prolactin. Prolactin is involved in so many different problems from hypertension. Like antiproliferative drugs will resolve hypertension sometimes.

Danny Roddy:
And the horseshoe shape there are... I think 1975 or 1985, but a group said that the balding area of scalp, the amount of de-granulated mass cells was a striking feature. Mass cells are types of cells that interface with the environment. So I think you have the model out of your skin and then in your intestinal tract. I asked Ray in 2014, what's the function of mass cells? He thought it was like to guide the differentiation and development of STEM cells.

Danny Roddy:
So like talking about STEM cells is like all the rage and hair loss and stuff. But the interesting thing is that mass cells, and I'm referencing this from a paper, they called them like an actor and that they could change depending on the environment they were in.

Danny Roddy:
So naturally if you have like a very high polyunsaturated fat diet, you're going to change the function of the mass cells. Maybe they're not able to fully support the development and differentiation of the hair follicle when the person is loaded with polyunsaturated fats because I think mass cells are sources of arachidonic acid as well.

Danny Roddy:
So again, I'm far from understanding this stuff and somebody will probably do it. That's not me, but I think these are the important things that are not being asked about in the general community of pattern hair loss, and people are so stuck on this masculinity model of just basically assuming that something about the masculinity causes the hair loss. And I think that will lead a person down the wrong road 100% of the time.

Jayton Miller:
So if somebody say has high prolactin, high cortisol, high serotonin, what are some specific steps that you would give them in order to begin lowering those as much as possible and increasing protective hormones?

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. So this is a tricky thing too. So I would say the age of the person was pretty important. So I talked to lots of young guys and I'm a big advocate of simplicity. I don't know about you, but whenever I make things too complex, it destabilizes me. So whenever I get back to a simple thing, it kind of helps me out. So if I were talking to somebody like twenty-five 30 losing their hair, I think my general suggestion would be because it's the easiest thing to immediately interact with would be trying to change around their nutrition.

Danny Roddy:
I think some of the most immediate important things are the amount of calcium to phosphorus. So if a person has an abundance of phosphorus in their diet, that turns on the parathyroid hormone, the prolactin, and there's a good amount of evidence that suggests those are not only bad for the person's general health, but I think can interfere with the development of the hair follicle in general.

Danny Roddy:
But yeah, so getting a generous amount of calcium, so maybe like 2,000 milligrams or something to help hold down the parathyroid hormone and prolactin, and that is fairly difficult. So a person could spend a long time just trying to work in a, I don't know, milk and cheese or Parmigiano-Reggiano specifically into their diet. And that would be one of the first things. And another thing would be just making sure they weren't doing no harm like their nutrition wasn't actively harming their intestine or eating like a hard to digest diet, I think.

Danny Roddy:
There are other things like the calcium phosphorus, easy to digest diet, including things like liver and oysters and eggs. Those are being like supplemental foods to just nourish a person. I don't know of a better way to get the various minerals and vitamins and things other than including those foods regularly.

Danny Roddy:
This one is more controversial but sugars compared to starches. So the general elevator pitch being like I think if a person has some kind of intestinal problem, the starches can contribute to that by more substance in the large intestine and cause problems with bacterial endotoxin. Under the radar, I receive a handful of emails from people saying they remove starches from their diet and they feel a lot better.

Danny Roddy:
It's like a complex issue because I think sometimes people with poor liver function gravitate to starches maybe cause it's like a more prolonged release of glucose over a period of time. But anyways, okay, so liver, oysters, sugars over starches calcium or phosphorus. And then I think if a person were motivated, they could always go get lab tests. So they could get like the TSH, the total cholesterol, the prolactin, the vitamin D, the parathyroid hormone, the serum phosphorus, maybe the reverse T3. And they can measure their temperature and pulse.

Danny Roddy:
So I think the goal here being that accumulating as much information about yourself as possible. You know what you're eating. I'm not a religious food tracker person, but if a person has zero idea of how much protein carbohydrate and fat they're eating, they should probably put that into a chronometer and just until they could eyeball it.

Danny Roddy:
Then the lab test. Occasionally the lab test can reveal something that would be impossible to guess, and then that could immediately orient a person in a certain direction. For example, I talked to somebody for like months that was tweaking every little aspect of their diet, but it turns out they're prolactin was like 50 nanograms per milliliter or deciliters. I think milliliter. And that's like outrageously high.

Danny Roddy:
I think that would orient them towards trying to reduce prolactin with all the things available to reduce prolactin. So again, trying to accumulate as much information as possible and then trying to address those things in the way the person thinks is appropriate rather than something they think they should have to do because whenever somebody thinks they have to do something, I think that usually ends really, really poorly.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah, for sure. So what are some of the lifestyle tips that you would give people.

Danny Roddy:
Yeah, don't go to Thailand, Bangkok. Don't live there. Don't be around the MF in Bangkok or the pollution. That's a joke. That's where I am right now. So I think this is difficult too because everybody has different lives and things. The red light, I think that's important. So getting a brooder and a $30 bulb, 250-watt bulb and putting those around like your work area, that that would be a cheap something to implement that could improve the person's quality of life. This is random, but turning off the Wi-Fi in the home maybe plugging in like via ethernet. And if you're around your router maybe moving it to another room or getting... I know there were like less powerful routers now with Wi-Fi that turn off at certain times and things.

Danny Roddy:
A random story, but in Mexico, I lived in a rural area and I have an Acousticom 2 RF meter, which is like fairly expensive like $300. And even walking across a field to the grocery store, the meter would be going off the charts. It's not really real until you measure it. That's made it real to me because I had no idea how much RF was around my neighborhood until I measured it.

Danny Roddy:
This sounds odd, but drinking lots of water, I think can... If a person is borderline low thyroid can increase their prolactin and that's something that's been studied. So I won't get into it, but I think it can interfere with your libido if you just drink it. What I'm trying to say is, I don't think just drinking a bunch of water is healthy per se and it can actually harm a person. So obviously drink if you're thirsty, but milk and orange juice and coffee, those are all contained water.

Danny Roddy:
So I don't think a person necessarily has to drink extra water every day. I didn't really get into it, but things like thyroid, those can be macro therapies and can really move a person, I think in a good direction, if they're really not doing well. You mentioned it earlier, but the hypothyroidism the unsuspected illness, I think that's an essential read because, again, I don't want people trusting me to take thyroid. They should check out Broda's book because he goes over how many different manifestations of poor health, the low thyroid can result in. So clumsiness or whatever can be a result of low thyroid.

Jayton Miller:
Or cretinism even.

Danny Roddy:
Yeah.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. It's fascinating.

Danny Roddy:
He's also said there's like a difference between a genius and a really low intelligence person. It's like a few grains of thyroid. So yeah, man. And we're not living in the smartest time.

Jayton Miller:
So EMF and the water?

Danny Roddy:
EMF, yeah, the water. I got off track here. I'm blanking on things that you can do light. Trying to get sun, if you have it available. I know that can be difficult sometimes.

Jayton Miller:
What's your philosophy on movement in general, just like from walking to resistance training and things like that?

Danny Roddy:
So I would talk to Jayton about that. He would be my main source for the movement. So I'm very sedentary. I wouldn't expect anybody to take their exercise advice from me, but I walk a lot. When I'm talking to people, when they mentioned that they're exercising, a lot of the times, I'm thinking like, how would they be helped if they stopped exercising? I'm sure you have a very intelligent approach to it, but I just think the kill yourself in the gym is so prevalent, and I doubt that's like really serving that many people.

Danny Roddy:
I don't know if you saw my Twitter. I posted some old photos of people that you'd look at and you'd be like, "Oh my God that person is morbidly obese. They should hit the gym or something." But in actuality, they're just like extremely hypothyroid. When they took a few grains of thyroid within a few months, they looked like different people. And then I need to get the source, but Ray often talks about that paper where hypothyroid women go into like a clinical ward and they gain weight on more than 700 calories per day.

Danny Roddy:
So it's like, yeah, try to solve your metabolic problems. I'm sure smart concentric exercise would be useful with somebody who has an intelligent approach to that. But I think that's like the 1% of the exercise world. So I don't have any specific approach. And the only other thing is sometimes I'll say if you have to breathe through your mouth during the exercise, it's probably too hard. It's probably having the opposite effect that you want it to.

Jayton Miller:
Whenever it comes to the face swelling, one of the commonalities that I've seen is like because thyroid hormone is low, estrogen is high, and then their rate of edema goes up, and so they have all of this water that's sitting in their peripheral tissues, just sitting there pushing the skin out.

Danny Roddy:
I think that's like the function of estrogen is to cause the uptake of water to get cells ready to divide. So that's like an interesting thing. Again, not my knowledge base, but everything being this push and pull between growth and then estrogen being this mediator. Ray calls it the hormone of new beginnings start something over. But that hormone of new beginnings is always in the context of those steroids like the pregnenolone, progesterone, DHEA, thyroid.

Danny Roddy:
So when those steroids decline and you have the hormone of new beginnings reverting back to like a blob basically. I don't say this to be mean or anything, but I lived in Mexico for a while and I met some people taking HRT like estrogen replacement and they literally do have like blob features. They're not differentiated. And I suspect it was probably because they're taking estrogen all the time.

Jayton Miller:
That's one interesting thing that I've seen who every time that I see somebody who is on some kind of cancer treatment, specifically a type of chemotherapy is they look like they're eaten away, but at the same time they have this weird swell to them. And I think it's because basically the chemotherapy is pushing them more into that reductive state. So it's allowing the cortisone, the estrogen to thrive while it's trying to kill off the actual cancer that is there.

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. I don't know that much about it, but nothing you said sounds not accurate to me.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. I think Georgie said at one time about the teratomas being in a reductive state and how cortisol and estrogen actually protect the tumor itself.

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. Tumors are doing like a bunch of weird things. I screw it up explaining it, but they... I was reading some interesting component of lipid peroxidation either. They do... I'm going to screw it up even going into it. Anyways, they're doing something very odd. It doesn't even completely make sense to me. I actually have it written down to ask Ray on another podcast. But yeah, definitely fascinating.

Jayton Miller:
Yeah. So I guess for wrapping everything up and giving the action steps to take away from this, what are the biggest action tips you would give to listeners?

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. So I guess I always recommend people be skeptical. I would advocate for self-knowledge and trying to accumulate information about yourself. So if you're like what was said is nonsense, it doesn't apply to me, my recommendation would be to measure your underarm temperature and your pulse rate, and then go from there because I haven't talked to anybody that was losing scalp hair that did not have a lower temperature and pulse rate.

Danny Roddy:
So I think maybe an ideal temperature and pulse is around like 98.6 degrees in the afternoon with a pulse of maybe about 80 beats per minute would coincide with good thyroid function. And kids, I posted something on my Twitter, that's saying like a newborn, it goes from like 140 pulse rate until, I think 85 when they're eight years old.

Danny Roddy:
So again, this is like the lifelong decline of the metabolic rate and the pulse is one of those things indicating the rate of metabolism. So they're even low card people like bragging how low their pulses were. So I think that just speaks to how low their rates and metabolism are. So getting those markers and then maybe, I don't know, putting your food into chronometer seeing what the calcium phosphorus was. I imagine most of the time phosphorus is way higher than the calcium.

Danny Roddy:
So again, that person, if their temperature and pulse were low and then the person is chronically eating more phosphorus and calcium, they're basically in a chronic state of stress. Even just sitting, doing nothing, their body is in an adaptation mode and they're consuming themselves to get through the day.

Danny Roddy:
So breaking out of that is very difficult and a lot to learn. The content I make is the content I wish was available in 2012 or 2011 when I got into race stuff. So that's why I do that stuff. Going from there, accumulating information and then trying to apply it to your own situation and evaluating your own relationship with stress.

Danny Roddy:
When Ray started talking about stress and thyroid, to me, it was just so obvious that my life was explained by this stuff that I had tension, shyness. Just all these things that explained my teams and in my early 20s and things. It just made a lot of sense to me.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. So that kind of gives me one last question to ask. What is your perception of the subconscious effect of holding on to emotions in certain past circumstances and the effect that, that has on our current day metabolic rate and just our reality?

Danny Roddy:
Yeah. So I don't have anything super high brow to say about this, but I'll just give my own experience. I'm somebody that grips the past with a death grip. My whole life is characterized by like, "Oh my God, I should've done that. I should have done this. Why didn't you say that? You screwed up with this girl. She won't text you back. You totally blew it." I would just live in the past like 24/7.

Danny Roddy:
Again, I don't think I'm some amazing specimen or anything like that, but I do think Ray's information in general about thyroid function, about regaining your agency and things like that. I think it's allowed me to more focus on the future and not just obsess about things that had happened in my past. So one of my friends emailed Ray about that specific thing and Ray had a really beautiful answer and he's like, "Nothing is stored and everything is fluid."

Danny Roddy:
Depending on the specific physiology is most likely how you'll feel about a situation. And again, this is over my head, but he's talking about a resonance and you resonating with like previous versions of yourself. So maybe if you took like a thyroid toxic drug, you'd feel more of yourself when in a really bad state that you're in, if that makes any sense.

Danny Roddy:
I really do think it's the physiology driving the perception of things. In fact, there's something called negative activity. It's some kind of like psychiatry diagnosis. I don't put a lot of stock into that, but it's like the tendency to see things, see events or people in a negative way. And it's like a disproportionately negative way. And it turns out these people have high cortisol levels when they're actually studied.

Danny Roddy:
So I just think life is very difficult right now, but I think it's easier when your thyroid function is high because again, I think it's just provides more optimism and then like letting go of these past things that doesn't really fulfill any function, just like ruminating on them forever.

Jayton Miller:
Definitely. One of the books that I'm currently reading is Letting Go: The Pathway to Surrender. I think it's David Hawkins. I definitely got the last name right. The first name is probably not right. So Letting Go is the name of the book. But it talks a lot about how our subconscious reality can affect our present reality. It almost makes me think that if we were to look at our life on like a span, it almost goes with the waves of serotonin that we might be experiencing throughout our lifetime. So the past circumstances that we were in was a very serotonin dense state.

Danny Roddy:
Well, did you ever see Georgie Saba's research on... He talked about serotonin and imprinting certain hormonal states and things like that. Exactly what you said is what he researched and that Ray has of course talked about it. But he called it like hormonal imprinting. So say somebody has some kind of traumatic thing, I think in Georgie Saba's point of view that would leave an imprint or maybe the person is more sensitive to serotonin from that point on. So I can forward you his papers, but it's interesting stuff.

Jayton Miller:
Thank you. Sounds good. Well, if you'll stay on here for a minute, I'm going to wrap this up. Thank you for everyone who jumped on here and listening. Danny, thank you for coming on here. I really appreciate your time. I know you're a busy man. If you haven't already, please make sure to get inside our Facebook group. We have a bunch of people in there absolutely killing it on the Thermo Diet.

Jayton Miller:
We get a lot of our foundational principles from Ray Peat and his philosophy. So please make sure to take a look at his work, take a look at Danny's work. It's absolutely amazing. I'm obviously a fan of it. Make sure to like and subscribe, and I will talk to you next time. Have a good one.

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