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Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 15 - Why We Do What We Do

Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 15 - Why We Do What We Do

In this episode of The Thermo Diet Podcast Christopher Walker and Jayton Miller sit down and talk about the reasons that they do what they do. Why they got into health and why they decided to help spread the word of how to achieve optimal health. You get to hear all of Chris and Jayton's story about their health problems and what they had to go through to begin the journey to where they are now.

Check it out and let us know what you think in the comments below!

 

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Full Transcript:

Chris:
What's up, everyone? We're back again with another episode of the Thermo Diet podcast. My name is Christopher Walker and I'm here with Jay... Damn it. I had a name, I forgot it. Jayton Miller, Mueller. Yeah, anyway so Jayton and I are here.

Jayton:
How's it going?

Chris:
Pretty good. Very good. Do you have any new nicknames?

Jayton:
Ah man, the Wolf of Pearl Street, that was one.

Speaker 3:
Wolf of Pearl Street.

Chris:
Nice. Pearl street, we're here off of Pearl street in Boulder, Colorado, for those people who don't know. So that makes sense. Damn, I'm jealous of that name. I want that name.

Jayton:
It's a for the Thermo market that's coming out pretty soon.

Chris:
Thermo market.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
So cool. So today we're going to be talking about why we do what we do.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Yeah, that'd be an interesting idea, Jane brought it up. It's kind of give a bit of a backstory, especially for people that don't really know us very well, that this might be helpful. Shed some light on stuff?

Jayton:
Heck yeah. So what get you started on this journey and why did you decide to spread it to the world?

Chris:
So back when I was 17, I was still in high school and I started having a lot of health problems.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
Lost a ton of weight, super skinny, depressed, everything. Had no idea really what was happening, by the time I was done with my freshman year at Duke. I went back for the sophomore year for a little while, a couple months, but I was so massively depressed and had really bad hormone problems at that point. That I had to take a medical leave from school and basically figure out what was going on. And then it wasn't until probably, that following spring that I actually finally asked the doctor, "Give me a blood test, I need a blood test." I had all these problems and the doctor was literally, they'd never measured my blood.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
They even put me in therapy. They were prescribing me antidepressants and whatever. And I had to go to therapy like, "Are you freaking kidding me?" So I go in and I finally get this blood test, and he looks at it for one second, he's like, "Oh God, I got to send you to a specialist, there's a lot of stuff wrong here." So he sent me to a hematologist-oncologist in Northern Virginia, who ran a full blood panel. At that point I was 19 and he was like, "I think you have a brain tumor." So then we got the MRI and it was there in my pituitary, and I was like, "Oh geez". So that whole thing, and then essentially that led me down this road of... Because the only options that they gave were surgery, or medication for the rest of my life. And I was like, "I don't really want to do either one of those and that doesn't sound good."

Chris:
So I tried to solve it naturally and ended up getting rid of all the symptoms naturally. So over that process, that's how I've really started learning how of the roots of Thermo's philosophy, and then it's been developing over the last 10 years since then into what it is now. Just through self-learning and so forth. But part of what's fueling it was just even the bad experience with the medical establishment as it exists right now. The fact that they... I had a brain tumor and they never tested my blood, even with all the symptoms present, they never did a blood test to figure out what was actually happening, like any sort of data. And they were willing to just give me antidepressants and put me in a group therapy. It's just so backwards.

Chris:
Thats been fueling a lot of my drive right now, building UMZU and Thermo, just because of the nature of that. And I know that everyone else experiences stuff like that as well, because that's literally how it operates the medical system. They don't look for real data, they don't have a systemic view of how the body works. Everyone is a specialist and they all focus on their own specialty.

Chris:
Just for those people who don't know, I finished my degree at Duke in Neuroscience. So I learned how to read research and learned how to... I learned a lot about the research industry in and of itself because that's a big research institution and there's a huge hospital there at Duke med. And some of the top doctors, and researchers in the world worked there. But I also learned all the bad sides to it that no one ever talks about. And the fact that there still is so much unknown, so much bias, so much dogma, that the way that stuff runs. And it just blows my mind and continues to all the time, and just how backwards this whole system really is, for helping people to heal themselves.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
That whole medical establishment is not set up in present day to help you heal yourself at all. So that's really like the backstory of the, why? I'm sitting here right now with what we have right now. Building UMZU, we have the best natural formulas for helping you, actually work with your body using natural ingredients, help your body to heal itself because it's a self healing organism. And that goes back to the idea of with Thermo, with the activators and blockers, so the concept of introducing certain things into your body to help it heal itself.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
And then eliminating other things from your experience and your biology that are going to cause you to move away from health.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
The blockers.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
So that's really how its evolved. And then my main, in terms of online and just kind of body work stuff. The first thing I ever did was... I was obsessed with, we focused on testosterone levels personally. Because in the pituitary gland is kind of at the seat of the brain and it controls your endocrine system, all the communication in your body for your endocrine system.

Chris:
So I had other problems, but that was the highlight for 19 year old guy having low testosterone next to zero. So I just got obsessed with testosterone, and naturally raised it pretty high and figured out systematically how people can do it. Using what we call the Masculine Optimization Pyramid, focused on micronutrients first, nutrition, lifestyle elements, eliminating blockers within the lifestyle elements. That's probably where the blockers started from, it's a lot of lifestyles stuff.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
And then in exposure to things and that sort of thing. Then training principles and supplementation, which I've always been really into supplements. So it's naturally fitting that I own a supplement company because they're cool, they're really freaking cool. And when you start to realize how many cool compounds there are out there, that actually perform. A lot of drugs like Big Pharma drug is actually just made off of, they're synthetically modified to be unique and patentable.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Chris:
But they look at natural compounds to do so. That's where they start most of this stuff. They're looking for like, what can we make proprietary and controllable and FDA regulated, so that we can sell a ton of this stuff without any competition to people. The problem is in... You see it even in a lot, it's going on a lot right now in the cannabis industry, they're doing the same stuff. Like where people... Like you take a plant, that has a lot of different properties in compounds within the plant, right? So tons of plants, you can extract all sorts of stuff from plants that are very helpful.

Chris:
People have been doing it for thousands of years, this is not a new thing obviously. The traditional Chinese medicine, and Eastern medicine has always been doing this. And even Western medicine, if you look at the idea of native American cultures.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
They've been using plant extracts forever. But the pharmaceutical industry is literally going in there and trying to modify things, and isolate things, and then make synthetic versions with a slight variation on it, to make sure that they can claim that it's a proprietary thing and then run it through their FDA approval process and so forth. The issue with that, well I was going to mention with cannabis is that, you end up hurting the body because there are the other things that need to be present typically aren't.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
When they do that. And then they are modifying the molecular structure of these compounds. So that it can have some acute effect that someone feels, but the lack of kind of a foresight or just maybe even caring, leads to all these other side effects. Whereas when you have like a really great organic compound that's naturally found in nature and it's extracted correctly, then you don't have side effects, you can achieve similar results or better results without the additional side effects. The side effect thing makes a lot of sense with the pharma model too, because they're going to sell you drugs for the side effects as well.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
And it's pretty messed up, but that's their business model. And with cannabis, what they're doing is instead of doing full plant extracts and so forth, in order to regulate certain and make proprietary drugs, pharmaceutical stuff, to get it through the FDA approval. They're literally just taking everything, isolating everything, and then adding it back together, and omitting certain stuff from the drug.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
And then it just doesn't work as well. And it's kind of messed up how you can... The way the system is set up right now, with the government you can do that, and make an inferior compound, and then make everything else either demonized or illegal that is competing with you.

Jayton:
Yeah, and then the FDA is really picky about their studies because they tend to cherry-pick them. So you can literally have the exact same study with a natural herb that has several different compounds in it that are all beneficial, and then you have an FDA study and they're both rat studies. So the exact same study, but one of them is a pharmaceutical that they want to push for, to sell. And then the other one is just an unclaimed supplement that they can't regulate. So they'll basically give a negative connotation to that rat study and push it to the side or not pass it. Then the FDA on the exact same rat study just on a pharmaceutical will push it and base their entire philosophy of that specific pharmaceutical on that one rat study. They don't have any longterm evidence, no human trials or anything.

Chris:
That's a lot of those perpetuated Urban Arch, conventional wisdom studies, or ideas, there based on really bad evidence.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
But they get perpetuated through the medical community and then the general populations start to believe it as being true.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
Yeah, it's backward. So that's my, why? That's why I'm doing this so fervently because I think there's a better way and people need to know about it.

Jayton:
Definitely.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
Heck yeah.

Chris:
What about you, why are you so interested in health?

Jayton:
So it kind of started around the same time. It was around 18 for me whenever I started experiencing problems. So right after football, my senior year. I decided that I didn't want to play football in college, I just wanted to go ahead and go to school. So in doing that I had all this excess weight that I didn't necessarily need for football, so I decided to drop it. I dropped probably 50 pounds in three months very quick. And it was not sustainable at all and I think during that time I just completely threw my body out of whack.

Chris:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jayton:
Just all kinds of things started to go wrong. It would be a 100 degrees outside and I have a sweater and jeans on and I'd be freezing all the time.

Chris:
Yeah, that's a really common thing I hear with rapid weight loss.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
People have bad thyroid issues.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
So that was my problem is that I had severe hypothyroidism, and it actually led to acute hypogonadism and stuff like that. And then my hair was falling out, I couldn't sleep whenever I did sleep, it wasn't very good sleep. I got to the point to where... So that was my senior year in high school. Then I worked that summer and then I went into school, and whenever I went into school on top of that I had to deal with the emotional stress, my parents splitting up right whenever I got dropped off at school. So I was doing all of this on my own and there were days that I barely even had the strength to throw the covers off whenever I got out of bed. I'd wake up and there was literally not a single ounce of willpower inside my body to get up.

Jayton:
So just thinking back on that experience, and then I was following you on Instagram, and I was following a whole bunch of people on the [inaudible 00:14:28] community. And I had all the resources at UNT, being a pre-med student in the biology department. So I basically, I had the foundation of what I needed to kind of dig around myself. So I did that and then I got into contact with you and that whole story came about and then I came here. Over that time I kind of... So they put me on T4, which did absolutely nothing, I was on T4 for about a year, didn't do a single thing. So I stopped taking it and then I basically, just have been fighting an uphill battle ever since then. It's a lot better now, I feel fantastic right now, but it's taken a lot of time, and it's taken a lot of effort, It's been very difficult.

Jayton:
Over the past year and a half, especially just focusing on that and I find that whenever I focus more on the psychological, that the physiological things just tend to happen and fall into place a lot easier. So that's where my focus is been, especially recently, is just honing in on the psychological things and then letting all the physiological things just kind of fall into place.

Chris:
Life was a mental game.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). But so-

Chris:
What kind of psychological things would you say would be helpful to build momentum in that sense?

Jayton:
Yeah, so I think the biggest thing that helped me at first was just kind of, I was very out of tune with my body. I didn't know how to tell when my fingers got warm, I was just completely desensitized to myself in a sense. So some of the things that I would do was, I would meditate and during this meditation I would start with breathing for five minutes. So I would just focus on my breathing and then after that five minutes I would move to a specific part of my body and I would focus every ounce of my energy on that one spot, and I would think of everything down to the marrow inside of the bone, and then I would add every single tissue on top of that, and just imagine it coming all the way out into the flesh and the skin.

Jayton:
So for instance, like a toe, I would start with the bone marrow, then the bone, and then the muscle tissue, and then the fluid that surrounds that, and that's in there. Then it would be the skin tissue, and then the toenail, and then maybe I had a little bit of hair on my toe that I would imagine too. So I would just break it down in detail as much as possible.

Chris:
And your toe ring?

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
The cherry on top.

Jayton:
Yeah. But yeah, I would say that was probably the biggest thing that allowed me to kind of take that step was meditation. And then just whenever I wasn't doing schoolwork, I was reading, or watching a YouTube video, just constantly trying to get my hands on information that could help me. And I came across a lot of BS, a lot of it.

Chris:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jayton:
And I think one of the biggest motivators for me is giving the people the tools that they need, that's going to work the first time. So they don't have to go through all of this trial and error and basically lose hope because they failed so many times because they didn't have the right tools necessary. And so I want to provide those tools for people to allow them to effectively do that the first time that they do it.

Chris:
Yeah, that's good.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
Yeah, because there is a way to do it right. A lot of people get kind of disenfranchised after they try a bunch of stuff over and over and then they just give up.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
They're like, "Well screw it's genetic, I have no power over my own life, nothing works."

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
So and again, that also comes down to a way of thinking about things, which I think is... That's been a big intention in the Thermo concept and the philosophy to you is... Once you start thinking about things in the way of Thermo, you see the world really different.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
So you can't unsee that anymore. But it's a brilliant important mental thing. You start to just look at things in a different way than most people, and you're like, "Whoa, okay, this makes a lot more sense, I have a lot more power over what I'm doing." And it works. So that's been an important part of it.

Jayton:
Yeah. So whenever you were going through that bout of depression, what was one of the things that kept you going during that time?

Chris:
I don't know. I've never not thought about going.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Just keep on going, forward motion.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
No matter what.

Jayton:
Did you have some kind of support system?

Chris:
Yeah, my family.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Yeah. But one of the things that I learned really fast about depression was that it is a biological symptom.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
It's something that you can still control. With a lot of people with mental health things, they chalk it up to being... They just say the common thing is like, "It's a chemical imbalance in my brain." Well, it's not untrue, but that doesn't mean you can't do anything about it.

Jayton:
Right.

Chris:
Especially, because it is a chemical thing, you can do something about it.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
And reading the work of William Walsh, I think it's really important.

Jayton:
Oh my gosh. [crosstalk 00:20:24]

Chris:
He's got formulas really based on studying 10,000 patients or something crazy like that. Clinically, with depression issues on the mild side and then all the way up to Schizophrenia, Bipolar, everything.

Jayton:
Even Autistic Spectrum Disorder, is that what it is?

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
So he even helped a lot of those people too.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
Which is really interesting.

Chris:
So when you start to see things that way though, you're like, "Okay". This is like the law of causing effect still exists in this sense.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
Your brain, your body, is not just this black box where the universal laws don't apply.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
So the exact opposite. You can totally manipulate your body to help it heal itself, like I was saying. And in the sense of depression, a lot of depression is just caused by deficiencies.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
There can be acute depressions caused by traumatic experiences, but there's still a biological basis of that.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
It's not just psychological because psychology feeds the biology and there's a feedback loop there. So even traumatic experiences, they cause a lot of acute stress, but you can still mitigate stress through biology obviously.

Jayton:
Definitely.

Chris:
Because that's where it manifests. It's always manifesting in your body. So yeah, that's kind of what I was learning and then I learned about obviously the hormone effect going on. So there's the micronutrients and hormones and they all play together. So that's how you get out of depression issues.

Jayton:
Yeah. Now and it's interesting because whenever cortisol and adrenaline are high, the prefrontal cortex tends to shrink, and so does the hippocampus in the amygdala is basically working over time, which is really interesting because that's the main, isn't that the main area where emotions are experienced?

Chris:
And fear.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
And so-

Chris:
That's what they say, I don't.

Jayton:
So it's really interesting to kind of correlate those two. And then you can use certain dietary methods and supplements to downregulate adrenaline and cortisol.

Chris:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jayton:
Then that has a direct impact on that.

Chris:
Yeah, I think. I'm always skeptical and curious about the way that people classify brain regions.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
Because that was all I was exposed to in college. Even the researchers they have just I think a very oversimplified view of brain stuff. They're like, "Oh yeah, there's blood flowing through this area at this point, so it must be a motion area." Where it's not untrue that people, like in brain studies they're going to basically be measuring that and they're going to look at, "Oh, this person in this study is experiencing fear, so in this part of the area, the brain is lighting up. So okay, that's good." I'm just going on a bit of a rant here. But I do think it's still important to look at the brain in a holistic view, in kind of what you're saying too. When your adrenaline is high, you're going to see a lack of activity in certain areas, that in a concentration of activity and not in another area. And it's kind of more of a illustration of like maybe how someone should think about it too, make sure that they're not over active in certain emotions and that sort of thing.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
Which still can be controlled by biology. But yeah, anyway. Sorry, I don't even know where I was going with that, but-

Jayton:
Me either. So that's really all I got to as what my, why is?. Do you have anything else that you'd like to add?

Chris:
Yeah, at this point it's not about me or you, it's we're doing stuff now based on finding a better way for other people to walk because it's insane how few resources there are to do this.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
I don't know about you, but it was really difficult for me to find any sort of good information that people were actually teaching.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
So that's why it took 10 years to figure it out.

Jayton:
I had to put puzzle pieces together and that's really difficult, especially whenever you don't know what you're looking at. Because whenever I first started looking into it, I had no idea what I was looking at. In a lot of-

Chris:
Yeah, it's a big puzzle and it's still a big puzzle. We don't have everything figured out, but I think we have a pretty good foundation established at this point. A lot of people are getting really good results and they're feeling way better.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
So we're on the right path and we're glad that everyone listening and watching is involved with it because there is a better way, you don't have to just buy what they're feeding you, because it's so backwards the way everything's set up right now. So our intention is to give you that better way, show you the path to walk down and hopefully correct your issues yourself.

Jayton:
Heck yeah.

Chris:
So all that being said, we have a really great supplement. It was actually, one of the very first formulas, I think it was the first formula for Truth Nutra before we changed the name to UMZU. But it's called Cortigon and this is for people that really want to build a better brain. If you are experiencing issues with depression, and anxiety, and focus memory issues, that sort of thing. A lot of it is tied down to excess of cortisol we've been talking about.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
And Cortigon naturally by the name, you can tell the original intention was really just formulate something that can help you regulate cortisol naturally and lower your cortisol naturally. And the cool thing about it is that the other ingredients in it as well, all the ingredients are synergistic, they'll work together really well.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
But they're all designed to support your brain health in the capacity that you're lowering your exposure to that excess cortisol. You can lower the cortisol naturally using Cortigon. But all the ingredients in it also help with certain neuronal capacity aspects in the ability to function cognitively better. Because what one thing that people notice in terms of a really evidenced symptom of excess cortisol levels is brain fog and it's kind of a nebulous symptom, right? Everyone knows what it is, where I'm just not able to focus, I feel stressed out, or on edge kind of anxious all the time. That's the brain fog and you don't feel like you're very productive throughout the day. A lot of people go through their day with brain fog and they just don't get anything done all day. They're just kind of float in there.

Jayton:
Yeah, almost like they're stuck in time war two because every time they look at the clock it's only a minute has passed.

Chris:
Yeah. A lot of people exist like that on a daily basis. And if that's something you don't want to deal with Cortigon is a good thing for you to take. You can go read the reviews over at umzu.com, we have a lot of great reviews on Cortigon and you'll notice there's common themes to those reviews. People say, "Well, I feel there's so much more focused, I'm so much more calm, my anxiety went away." I remember seeing one where it was like, "This is a game changer for my girlfriend, she started taking it, her anxiety has gone, she's being calm now, feeling really good." And you start to have more energy and it feels good to get out of that, and let the brain fog really lift and see how much you are really capable of. Because when you do go through those periods and hopefully you can get it towards all the time, where you're just feeling good all the time. You can get so much done and you start feeling better about yourself when you are getting a lot done to.

Chris:
Cortigon, the key ingredient, the main ingredient, it is called Phosphatidylserine. And Phosphatidylserine has a massive body of research on it for hormonal reasons including cortisol regulation, but also for even reversing neurodegenerative issues.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Chris:
So there is actually an FDA approved health claim on that, in older people that it can help to reverse neurodegenerative, or cognitive decline type stuff, and especially in Alzheimer's patients.

Jayton:
It's one of the most abundant amino phospholipids in the brain tissue too, isn't it?

Chris:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). It's a naturally occurring thing in your brain. It's just that a lot of deficiencies over the years and stress, and everything kind of depletes it. And that's why people have profound experiences as they get older when they start using Phosphatidylserine everything starts coming back into proper functioning. We also have a high dose of thiamin in it, also B6 six, and B12, and then Ginkgo biloba, which we've talked about before I think on the podcast, or in videos, or something.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
And Ginkgo is pretty awesome. Jayton found out it's the world's oldest tree.

Jayton:
Yeah, over 3,500 years old, which is from [crosstalk 00:29:54], yeah. And actually has a direct inhibitory effect on the secretion of cortisol, which is really interesting.

Chris:
So if you have a lot of stress and you don't want to have a lot of stress, Cortigon is going to be a good tool in your toolbox. I take two of them per day right now, you can take one per day. The way we formulated it now it's the exact dose you need is all just in one capsule, which is pretty helpful for a lot of people that don't like to take a lot of capsules every day.

Jayton:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris:
So you can take one. My dad takes a bunch. Its really helped him. He has one of those brains where it just doesn't turn off, and he has trouble sleeping because he's always thinking overactive. Which I would characterize as sympathetic dominance situation.

Jayton:
Definitely.

Chris:
So its really helped him a lot to just kind of calm his mind, focused throughout the day, get to sleep, and that sort of thing, so he takes it every single day. But yeah, you can check out Cortigon for yourself if this sounds interesting to you over at umzu.com, just search for Cortigon or you'll just find it on the homepage, it'll be on the homepage.

Jayton:
Thank you.

Chris:
All right. Well, thanks for listening to this episode of the Thermo Diet podcast. Hopefully, it was helpful for you. If you're not subscribed already just subscribe wherever you like listening to podcasts. So we have it pretty much everywhere I think at this point, iTunes, or Apple podcasts, or whatever, Google-

Jayton:
Spotify.

Chris:
Spotify.

Jayton:
YouTube.

Chris:
YouTube. You can find it everywhere, you'd find on the website also thermodiet.com and-

Jayton:
Make sure to hit up the Facebook group too.

Chris:
Yep. Get in that Facebook group, Thermo diet community on Facebook. Awesome group. Thanks for listening and we'll see you on the next episode.

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