Skip to content
Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 16 - How To Set Goals for 2020

Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 16 - How To Set Goals for 2020

In this episode of The Thermo Diet Podcast Christopher Walker and Jayton Miller sit down and talk about how they set their goals, some of the things they think about, and some of the ways that they follow through with those goals in order to achieve them.

Check it out and let us know what you think in the comments below!

 

Facebook Group and Fanpage -

Thermo Diet Community Group ( https://www.facebook.com/groups/16721... ) - Thermo Diet Fan Page ( https://www.facebook.com/thermodiet/ ) Youtube

Channels: - Christopher Walker ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTA1... ) - UMZU Health ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2IE... )

Instagram: -

@_christopherwalker ( https://www.instagram.com/_christophe... ) - @researchcowboy ( https://www.instagram.com/researchcow... )

Full Transcript:

Chris:
What's up everyone. Welcome back to another episode of The Thermo Diet podcast. My name is Christopher Walker and I am here with... damn! I forgot your name. I forgot what we decided.

Jayton:
Research animal?

Chris:
Research animal. Not the party animal, the research animal, Jayton Miller. So we are going to talk to you today. We thought it'd be cool because at the time of recording, we're coming up on the new year right now. So I'm just talking about some goals. What are our goals and maybe I'll give you guys some ideas for your own goals. I think it's very important to set goals. There's a lot of different camps in terms of philosophies on goal setting stuff. But I'm kind of convinced if you're not clear on what you want in general, you're never going to get what you want because you don't even know what you want.

Chris:
So a goal is something good. Sometimes people say they're bad, it's bad to goal set and all that go. Go with the flow or whatever. But I'm more of the opinion that we create our own experience in the world. We are the observers that are creating things. So it's helpful to have clarity to be able to get to clarity. And so we can probably talk about clarity too. Because I think that's an important part of goal setting.

Jayton:
Yeah. So what's your perspective on waiting for the new year to set your goals?

Chris:
I mean it's more of just like a temporal thing like, "Oh well end of the year start a new one." Time in general is just kind of fake almost. So it doesn't really matter when you set your goals just as long as you get clear on them and do them. The new year happens to be just a time where culturally people start to refocus. And I think people naturally work in cycles. Everything I think works in cycles. So you have this yearly cycle and a lot of times by the end of the year, people are just tired and they've probably missed the mark on a lot of their goals. And they're wanting to refocus on stuff and it's a good time to do it. In general, it can be very helpful to motivate yourself like, "Oh, all right." Getting through the end of the year whenever you start on an on a good foot next year, but you really don't need to wait. It's kind of what everyone does with dieting too, like I'll start Monday.

Chris:
If you look at more of a micro cycle for the year, it's almost the holidays are the weekend and then you eat too much, kind of fall off the wagon, most people say and then they start up again in the new year. It is more helpful to just be consistent in general.

Jayton:
Yeah. Definitely. So how do you gain clarity on your goals?

Chris:
Probably a good way to do it is actually to look back at what your goals were earlier. It could be last week, it could be last year, earlier this year, whatever. And look at the ones that you didn't achieve and try to figure out why you didn't achieve it. It's not necessarily bad that you didn't achieve it because a lot of times, especially people that are growth oriented people, which tend to be people that are setting goals, right? You evolve quite a bit over a year. And stuff that you care about at one point you stop caring about and you realize that it's really not that important. So your goals shift and that's totally fine. I mean, I think people get a bit too rigid with things. And so it's more about finding the fundamentals about why you want something and at your current maturity level and then going after that.

Chris:
But if your maturity level changes and you feel like it's a positive change and those goals kind of aren't important anymore. And that's totally cool.

Jayton:
Interesting. So we had a conversation the other day about getting very specific about our goals. So what are some of the ways that you specify your goals?

Chris:
Dates and numbers. In terms of gaining clarity, it's a lot of like, it's kind of almost as the law of attraction thing or whatever you want to call it. But it's the more clear you are with very detailed specifics about what you want, you tend to just start to gravitate toward it. And it might take years to get it. But I've had it happen a bunch of times in my life where I just became really fixated on something and then you almost, it's almost like a lot of times you just forget it but you're fixated on it in such a detail and then you forget it and then a couple of years later it's like, "Holy shit! I have it or it happened or whatever."

Chris:
And you don't even realize that. But I think the mechanics of it is you start to set your mind in motion toward that thing. And the more specific it is, the better because you have real clarity on it and it's almost, it becomes just a subconscious momentum toward it. Because you know what you want.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
And then you... It might take years, but it eventually happens. And I mean one thing that's a good one, especially with people that listened to this podcast, just visualization of... If you have like a physique goal or even outside of just your physique, but how do you want to feel with that? So you could... So it's take that with health, let's say someone has like 50 pounds to lose, right? If you have a clear concept visually in your head about how you want your body to look, it can drive how you're going to train.

Chris:
You can say I want bigger shoulders and tighter waist. And so you're going to naturally want to be like emphasizing shoulder training and upper chest and traps and that sort of thing and start really working on that. Because that's the only way you're ever going to get bigger shoulders if you actually train your shoulders so they can grow. And then a smaller waist, you start naturally gravitating toward it, if you're using the diet in the right way. So there's that. But then how are you going to feel about it? Or are you going to feel like waking up every single morning and it's, "Oh, I've got to go to the gym again because I'm achieving this through working out, over-training and eating too little. I have no energy." Kind of what you're talking about in another episode of you lost a lot of weight and then you did it in a way where you just destroyed your thyroid function-

Jayton:
Big time.

Chris:
-And you had no motivation to get out of bed. So it's... I think a lot of people focus on shallow stuff without really thinking through with clarity about how they want the whole experience to be. Because when you make the whole experience in your mind it becomes way more visceral and real and that's clarity. It's not just, I want to look like this movie star or something. It's more like, I want my body to look really good like these types of proportions. So I'm going to train in that way. But also just want to feel really great everyday. I want to wake up with more energy, I want to feel motivated, I want it to feel completely effortless to achieve that and maintain it. I want to feel productive in my daily, in my job and my career, I want it to enhance this full life experience.

Chris:
So if you can create an emotional experience for yourself in your mind of fully what you want, that is so much easier to make real. Because you're trying. You're not really missing anything if you think about it enough. It's also talking about, you were talking about the other day of one thing that helped you a lot was meditating and being mindfully focusing on certain areas of your body and thinking through everything and visualizing it all. I think it's a good practice. I mean that's an ancient practice. People have been doing that for a really long time and in this case for goal setting and clarity, gaining clarity, you can do the exact same thing with your whole life.

Chris:
You can say, "What do I want my day to look like every day? What do I want to feel like everyday? How much work do I want to do every day? Yeah. How productive do I want to be? What do I want to work toward in my career? What do I want to... How is my exercise or my diet enhancing and as a part of this whole puzzle? How do I feel all the time? That do I want to sleep really well? Whatever." That is how to get clarity. But you, it's really... It's trying to figure out every single variable you could possibly think of and meditating on it or having it constantly building in your mind because you can't typically do it all at once cause you don't know what you don't know. But as we evolve, we see access into these other areas of our life on an emotional, mental, physical level. And then you start to getting clarity becomes way easier. The more aware you are of everything.

Jayton:
Right? And one of the things that you said one time that really stuck out with me was, once you visualize all of the habits that that person is doing, the in-person that you want to become, if you just instill those habits and begin those now, then it's just a matter of time before you collapse into being that person.

Chris:
Yep. It's a... And that's an important part of this whole, the whole clarity thing. That's something that people miss. Because you could visualize the whole emotional experience, your physical experience, what you look like, whatever. But now the rubber always has to meet the road. And that's probably the whole thing with The Secret and everything. I think people completely misunderstood where they're, "I just got to visualize things and then they'll happen for me. I'll visualize, $100 million in my bank account and it's just going to be there. And well, 20 years goes by and still, no. There's no $100 million in my bank. Well I wonder why. Right? So now you have to look at, let's say... Let's just use that example, $100 million in your bank. It's going to be a momentous effort to get that.

Chris:
And so you have to, now you can go and you can be like, "That's still, that's what I want in life." At that point, right? Then you... The way to do it is to go find people who have $100 million in their bank account and study them. And whether that's meeting them in person or reading books written by them or about them or whatever, whoever, and it doesn't have to be money, but it's just like whoever has your goal, who has achieved it, study the heck out of that person. And everyone that you can find that is similar, who's also achieved a goal, look at the habits. Because those rituals that you do on a daily basis, those things are actually where the rubber is meeting the road. And that's what's walking you toward that.

Chris:
So you start to also increase the clarity over time. You don't... I think that's probably a pitfall of goal setting with people is that they think like, "I need to set this goal before January 1st and then I have to stick to it and that's it and if I fail, I would feel bad about myself and that." But you have to look at it more of an evolution because it is an awareness game and say you're studying somebody who has the health that you want, they have a great physique that you want for yourself. They have a lot of energy, mental clarity, good sleep, good sex life, whatever, all these elements that you might want. Find out everything that habitually that person is doing and start acting that way yourself. Because when you fully visualize that and you know how to let the rubber meet the road and do it on a daily basis you can step in and become that person now.

Chris:
You don't have to wait until January 1st. You don't have to wait till next year. You don't want to... Because again, it's the journey itself is in the evolution in your own mind is what's going to get you there. And that's really the reward in on and of itself. Because even when you get where you think right now, where you want to be and you get there and you're like, "Okay well, I feel good, great, what's next?" I've got to keep improving. I'm not going to stop. Right? But then if it's all habits that got you there, then it's not second nature, you don't know anything else now that's who you are.

Jayton:
How do you prioritize the different types of goals that you have so you know? How do you prioritize a physical goal over an intellectual goal or a spiritual goal or a business goal or things like that?

Chris:
I think the first step is getting the full clarity on your whole life. Because you can't isolate those things in a vacuum. A lot of people try to, and then that's where you run into problems. I've seen a bunch of times, people get so fixated on a physique goal that it destroys the rest of their life and they can't focus at work and they either lose their job or they can't be very productive in their daily life. Their relationships go way out of balance because they're being like a food nazi or something. And it's hard to be around someone like that. And I've seen that a lot with bodybuilder friends where they achieve amazing physiques and I'm just kind of, "Well." There you can literally see their life start to deteriorate around them as they're doing their show prep for six months or whatever. They break up with their girlfriend, they have all these problems, emotional issues or business starts failing.

Chris:
So it's more about finding that full scope of what you want in your life. And then the priorities are naturally there where you could say, "Okay, I have this circle here." You can draw it in a notebook. "All right, I've got my health goal, my mental goal or intellectual goal, my spiritual goal, my business goal, and... All right, how do I want to structure my daily life around doing a couple of habits that's going to get me to that?" And that you kind of reverse engineer it. And then is this compatible? Are these all compatible at the same time? Don't have enough bandwidth to do all this at once. And I've seen different, repeatable, successful people like say... And I think there's even like behavioral research around this sort of thing, where you can really only focus on a couple at a time and be excellent at it and really get there, two or three.

Chris:
So some people think more is better, but you're setting yourself up for failure if you have this giant ass list of stuff. So if you pick two or three things that you really going to focus on now and you can prioritize them based on your own desire, right? "Hey, I'm really overweight. I have a lot of health problems. I don't feel good on a daily basis, I'm not sleeping well." Health is probably going to be your priority. You should be, you should focus on that because it's going to leverage wise. Always thinking leverage that one thing is probably going to impact everything else positively in your life. So look for the leverage. Same with business, I'm always trying to look for what are these actions that I can take? Because you have say you have five minutes, can I take this action or this action in the five minutes, which one's going to get you the best result in the same period of time?

Jayton:
Yeah. So what are some of your goals that you're focused on right now? Going into the new year?

Chris:
So for 2020, I mean it's mostly about growing Umzu as a business and Thermo as a philosophy in my mind. I mean my whole life is this so, and I established a while back that I want my training and nutrition and everything with Thermo. I want that to be autopilot in my life. Where it's just what I do.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
And so I'm going to hit the gym three times a week no matter what or two times a week or whatever. But I'm going to have like a simple pattern that I can still work a lot on the business and then have this maintenance pattern where I'm slowly making progress, slowly getting leaner, stronger, et cetera. But it's on autopilot. It's like a program in your mind, a software program that's just running. So you don't have to think about anymore. If you take those things and put certain things at the subconscious level. That's my software, baseline, my program and it's going to keep me healthy. It's going to keep me feeling good and able to focus at work and able to execute at work and then... But it's not going to take too much on my time off. I'm not going to go and start and do a bodybuilding show. That would just be... That's not my priority. Right?

Jayton:
Right.

Chris:
So then the business goals being how we take this awesome team we have and continue to just be better every single day at what we do. And become a world class organization, world-class products, world-class customer acquisition, running the business itself, very healthy so that... Which I'm always learning new stuff about that. So I've got a few focuses on this entire year for Umzu is all about increasing the health of the business itself, as a functional financial unit, business entity that it's going to be extremely healthy. And then the on the team, in the culture here, continuing to improve and make it so it's like we have just an awesome high energy environment where everyone's excited to come to work and everyone's working on important things.

Jayton:
Yeah, we definitely don't have that right now. [inaudible 00:18:41]

Chris:
So those are really important as just broad goals for me. So now it's got to be this evolution of awareness in my mind for those goals. Always paying attention and learning more about how to make that happen properly and finding people, mentors, reading books about it, whatever to just find small tweaks. So every day, every week, every month, year it's getting better. Those are my main goals. So that the health goals are kind of on autopilot, which is beautiful thing about Thermo. Because once you're doing it habitually, you're just like, "Well great."

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
And there was a testimonial on the Thermo group today, Steve, where he's saying he's got that momentum, that clarity now and he knows and he's, he's manifesting all the results now and, and once you start to do that with Thermo and the lifestyle and the diet and everything it becomes like that software program, which, we kind of call it the Thermo effortless zone. Where it is just what you do now.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
It's how you eat.

Jayton:
So do you find that you have to instill a routine for that? Do you have a go-to routine that you do for that?

Chris:
My routine is pretty simple. I'm kind of a... I like flexibility. I like a bit of chaos too because I think all the opportunities in the chaos. So there's certain areas of my life I don't like to be very rigid, but most of my routine itself is just, I'm going to hit the gym in the morning, I'll wake up early, go to bed early, hit the gym in the morning or sometimes in the afternoons and then get to work early and be at the office. Do certain stuff.

Jayton:
So you've been working out before you come into work in the mornings?

Chris:
Yes. This morning I worked out.

Jayton:
[inaudible 00:20:40] I got to step up my game.

Chris:
[inaudible 00:20:42] dude.

Jayton:
Man.

Chris:
Yeah. I mean it's not optimal to work out in the morning hormonally, but for lifestyle reasons, I want to be able to be energetic when I get here and then feel awake. So I have caffeine before I work out and then go train. And they're not long sessions whatsoever. Usually I'm in and out in like 30 minutes.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
We'll just focus on key things that I want to work on. And you feel better when you get to the office and then I can be present at the office all day and not tired by the time I finally do get to the gym in the afternoon. So I could be tired and go home and eat a big Thermo bowl and watch The Office and go to bed. Right.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
So yeah. So to answer your question, my routine is pretty simple, so I can maintain the flexibility there. It's not so rigid. I think people fixate on rigid routines and you feel you've failed if you don't do it every single day. Or you go on it for two weeks and then you fall off. So set yourself up for it. Which, I mean for some people they just like hard driving. I got to be so structured and every days is mapped to the minute, but it doesn't work for me. Some people it does.

Jayton:
Yeah. I find myself to be kind of routine based. I do like a little bit of flexibility in there, but for the most part, once I fall into a routine, it's just like I don't have to think about anything. So I really liked that. What are some of the areas of goals that you think about?

Chris:
My primary really is a business because we have an awesome company here. Let's make it bigger. Let's reach more people. That's literally like my main focus. And then again, it's how many things can I just program into my routine or rituals that just helped me maintain my other stuff. That's really important. Like my health, having a couple of key relationships, but not too many. That's another thing that I think people... I don't mind cutting people out if they're not serving, helping me reach my goals. That's another important part of this. Relationships in your life can steer you away easily.

Jayton:
Definitely.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
You got to cut the fat?

Chris:
Yep. Just simplify everything. I mean, being simple, it's one of the hardest things to do in your life-

Jayton:
But it's extremely effective.

Chris:
Yeah. And it's rewarding when you do so. What about you? What are you thinking about for this year? Goal wise?

Jayton:
Oh man. So is towards the top of the list. Definitely. I think that we can do some really cool things here and I really want to get the Thermo word out to as many people as possible. Because I truly think that it's the most effective way to sustainably take care of yourself, longterm. And I think that the impact that it has on the psychological level is very important. As far as personal, I want to read anywhere from 25 to 50 books this year. Just something as an intellectual goal. Just because I love to learn and I don't feel like I'm learning enough. So I want to kind of elevate that even further.

Chris:
There's always more to learn.

Jayton:
Definitely. And it's like the more that I learn, the more that I know that I don't know-

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
-A lot.

Chris:
It's one of the-

Jayton:
I don't know anything.

Chris:
It's one of life's mysteries, the more you know, the less you know.

Jayton:
Exactly, yes.

Chris:
Which is cool. It's fun. It creates... It fosters exploratory energy in your life where you're always trying to figure something else out and solve problems and so forth.

Jayton:
Definitely. Yeah.

Chris:
Wrestle with these ideas and break old notions that you had. There were assumptions that might not have been true. I liked that because it could be uncertain things with certain books can be disturbing almost to shatter your worldview. But it's, I think it's extremely healthy to read all sorts of stuff like that. To challenge what you think because then it solidifies over time, which it's an evolution. Over time you start to really solidify really what you think.

Jayton:
Definitely. Yeah. And I feel every time that you learned something new in that way you gain a different window into the way that you view the world. So you get to get a new perspective and gain a larger awareness of the world that's around you, which I think enhances the experience itself. So I think that's really interesting. But yeah, other than that, those are my two main ones. I got some arbitrary physical goals that are just vain as far as strength goals and stuff like that. But I'll get there.

Chris:
Cool.

Jayton:
Yeah. Again.

Chris:
One thing I do want to do this year too is start painting again. Yeah. I'm probably doing an art show in Venice this year.

Jayton:
Nice.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
Heck yeah! I started riding and I've really enjoyed that so far. So I think I might continue to do that and continue to develop my copywriting skills.

Chris:
Yep.

Jayton:
So I'm really looking forward to that. I'm learning more about that aspect.

Chris:
Writing's a lot of fun. Because it helps you, with a lot of people try to avoid writing all the time and they think it's la chore. But if you embrace it, it's... When you write your ideas, and it could be something as simple as just writing a paragraph about your thoughts, but you can start to structure thoughts more efficiently. Because language itself it's extremely powerful and people don't give it enough thought. And it's almost this key between your mind in the world. And if you can start to structure thinking and communicate it, with increasing effectiveness, you can use that to get what you want in the world. And it goes back again to clarity too. You could read a sentence where you're like, "I don't know what that said." And then you could read another sentence. And it could be an entire book and you're like, "I don't know what was the point of me reading this book?"

Chris:
And there's a lot of people that write stuff like that. It's just like nebulous and not clear and rambling and nothing's important. Nothing important to said. Then you can also read a great writer who took 20 years of thinking on something he wrote one sentence and the one sentence is like, "Fuck that." That's awesome.

Jayton:
To chase you down to the core.

Chris:
Well, and then yeah, Shakespeare wrote, Brevity is the Soul of Wit. And if you have that sort of thinking. I like that quote because it's clear. Because the way it's so loaded too. Because wit implies wisdom and the wisdom has only ever earned or learned from someone else who earned it. But you can truly, I guess only ever really learned wisdom by the experience on a full level. But the weight itself is like the quick wisdom, like the ability to access it I think. And then brevity being obviously like the ability to communicate it fast and in a short segment or short thought that can pack a punch. And so that's where writing can be extremely powerful if you can practice it and refine it over time. It's a really beneficial skill. It's one of the key skills I think could make anybody as successful as they want to be.

Jayton:
Yeah, definitely. I found... And I think one thing that a lot of people steer away from it for is because we have such this negative connotation with it because of school, because we were forced to do it and doing it in a way that wasn't really creative or productive in an abstract sense. And so I think just sitting down and if you're thinking about something, just writing and just let the pin float, you don't even have to use punctuation or capital letters, just go and just let the page fill itself. And I found that that taught me, come to a lot of different conclusions and think of ways in a couple of different perspectives that I haven't been able to before. And it's been a really good tool.

Chris:
It's a good therapy to do that. Sort of freeform stream of consciousness writing. Yeah. I've been doing that for years. Where if I have... You get to those points that all the time, where so many thoughts just bounce around in your head and you're overwhelmed. You're like, "Ah, I've got to think through this." And it's easy to think when you're actually writing it out. And then if you do that stream of consciousness and you just know rules like you said, just say exactly what you're thinking, just type it out and it could take, in 20 minutes you feel so much better and you're like, "Oh!" I always find that I start those. I'll open like a text document on the computer, just start doing that and just writing, writing, writing. And then by the end of it I already solved the problem completely and you just feel really good. I'm like, "Oh okay!" Because you just allow yourself to just shit out all this nonsense in your head. And then eventually you're like, "Okay here's the solution here."

Jayton:
Now do you notice that typing is more effective for yourself or actually handwriting? Is an effective tool.

Chris:
Typing for me because I can type faster than I can write. And I don't feel... I use a notebook all the time for keeping track of stuff. But I don't actively write large amounts with a pen. So my hand isn't even... Kind of back in school, you could just write for days. My hand can't even handle it anymore and it can't keep up with my brain.

Jayton:
Yeah. I find that a lot too is like my brains about 10 words ahead of my hand, so.

Chris:
Yeah, I think that sort of stream of consciousness stuff is a lot more effective. It's being typed if you can type quickly Because you can keep up with it.

Jayton:
Yeah. I also find that something that's interesting is dictation, so you can just talk into your phone and it kind of writes down everything that you were thinking and just kind of talking yourself through it.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
I've done that a few times and it's been pretty effective as well.

Chris:
Yeah.

Jayton:
But you got anything else for goals?

Chris:
Well what do you think, so say let's say the Thermo Diet Facebook group, what do you think would be the most common goal in that group?

Jayton:
So some of the goals that I think that are going to be most effective or most common and the Thermo group are probably being comfortable with going out and-

Chris:
Going out to eat?

Jayton:
Yeah. Going out to eat and then communicating Thermo effectively. Because I feel like that's one thing that some of them struggle with.

Chris:
So are going out to eat. I mean the basic recommendation that we have for that has always been having a good Vitamin E supplement. Potentially also Coleen but-

Jayton:
Activated charcoal [inaudible 00:32:26].

Chris:
Activated charcoal but also when you're out to eat, it's not a binary situation, you don't have to be like, "I'm going out to eat, I'm just going to fucking eat a pile of doughnuts or something." You can find Thermo things are getting as close as possible to certain stuff.

Jayton:
Right.

Chris:
I mean a lot of restaurants will have some options. I mean even something like getting some oysters somewhere or enjoying smaller plates, if you can find roasted tubers or [inaudible 00:32:57] potatoes, you can always ask the chef to cook it in butter. It's really easy. I do it all the time.

Chris:
There's just simple things like that. And a lot of restaurants will accommodate it. Unless you're in a place where, I don't know, you're in a Chili's or something, they're probably going to have butter at Chili's, I don't know. But-

Jayton:
It's margarine.

Chris:
-Yeah. But I mean if you're in like a town and you're eating out at a small place or whatever, it's easy to just be like, "Hey, can you cook my potatoes and butter?" You can also just, it's all in your own power, you can actively search out places that have Thermo options.

Jayton:
Yeah, and I liked the fact that we can look at it on a spectrum. It doesn't have to be exactly Thermo, but if you can get it as close to Thermo as you can get, you can go out and get a steak in potatoes and the potato might not be organic. Mistake might not be grass fed, but it's close, and it's better than getting something that's fried, in PUFAs and then mashed potatoes that probably have a bunch of PUFAs and almond stuff like that too.

Chris:
Yeah. Exactly. It's more of a lifestyle thing and the building momentum toward your goal, right?

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Because the momentum is really the point. It's addicting and it becomes your program, your subconscious thing. And it's like, "What I do, if I'm going out to eat, I'll pick an option that is the best option that I can and I won't..." And, and the cool thing about Thermo is you don't really feel like you're the... with the food options themselves, you don't feel like you're restricting yourself. It's not like old diets that I'd tried in the past where you were like, "Oh man, all my friends are eating burgers and I'm sitting here eating the salad. Devon [inaudible 00:00:34:44], I'm on this diet, I've got to do this thing." But it's more like you can eat good art, fun options and just keep it at 80-20 rule.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Go for the leverage.

Jayton:
And I feel the psychological stress has a lot more detrimental than the one meal that you're going to be out with people. I think just relaxing about it and enjoying the time that you're spending with the people that you're with is going to be as beneficial as if that meal was 100% Thermo and a lot of cases too.

Chris:
So, okay. Well that's a goal for people like be able to have a more balanced existence I guess. Then hopefully those are some helpful tips. And in terms of communicating Thermo with your friends, what would you say, if you said the elevator pitch. I saw somebody put something in there, how would you structure an elevator pitch for Thermo?

Jayton:
I would say, so basically Thermo is the alleviation of blockers and the addition of activators that allow for energy to be produced in the body most effectively. And we do this by providing the body with glucose, which is the most preferred source of energy within the human body and avoiding things that are going to block the energy flow through the body. So things like vegetables, pie and saturated fats and stuff like that.

Chris:
Cool. Yeah. I think the, in the simplest way to say is eat fruits, roots and meat.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
And starch. That's the [inaudible 00:36:29] the couple of words, easy. But people asking why and that's a good explanation of that. But it's also just like I eat in a way that balances my hormones. That's an easy way to talk about it. I eat. I like to focus on foods that are easy to digest and it tastes good-

Jayton:
And nutrient-rich.

Chris:
-Nutrient rich. Yeah.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
Those are simple ways to explain it to people, but ultimately, it comes down to what are you going to... How do you think about it? And like how are you going to commit to communicating it? And it doesn't have to be an awkward scenario. A lot of the times people when they're asking you why you eat a certain way, they're either just genuinely curious or if you're very confident in it, they don't have an opportunity to be negative about it. Really.

Jayton:
Yeah.

Chris:
You're just like, "This is what I do. I feel great. I'm sleeping better." That's another way to explain. I sleep better, my sex life is better. I have more energy in my body, my physique is improving and so I'm eating this way and it's working. And people are going to be like, "Whoa, that sounds great. Let me try that."

Jayton:
And nine times out of 10, those people are questioning what they're doing anyways.

Chris:
Yeah, I mean most people do and because with nutrition is not clear. It's so confusing to the general population and because there's so many different voices telling people different things. So if you're just confident in what you're doing and it's working for you, just do it and stick with it and just be confident when you explain it. This is what I do. I feel great. More energy. I've lost a bunch of weight, I sleep better. It's so easy to maintain and the foods are all delicious. I mean that's... I don't know who would be not interested in that sort of thing.

Jayton:
Yeah. I know right?

Chris:
Yeah. But okay, well hopefully you guys got some good nuggets of some ideas for how you can gain clarity in your own life and set your own goals and set goals in a way that you thoroughly think through the goal as you're doing it, from an emotional, mental, physical and habitual level. How do you envision yourself and maybe you want to set a one year goal for 2020 you're like... Okay, fully visualize who you want to be and then learn as much about who that person, what that requires of you to become, get extreme clarity on that, down to the habits, everything, down to the thought patterns. Does that person that I want to be think negatively about X, Y, and Z situations or do they think positively about it? Those types of things. Get really clear on that and just step into it and just start doing it. And you literally would. The second you start acting that way you are that person and you just kind of have to walk it out and just do it.

Jayton:
Yeah, I would even add environmental into that too. Staying out of negative environments and putting yourself in a place that's going to allow you to be successful.

Chris:
Find every level of your experience. Look at every variable you can possibly think of. And what you'll find is that even by doing that exercise, there's no way you can possibly think of every variable involved. There are very finite amount of variables, but the finite amount is massive. So it's hard for the human brain to really process that much. So also just remembering that it's all about a personal evolution toward that goal and your goals might evolve with it and hopefully they do. And it's all about building momentum. But once you start thinking that way, then it becomes fun. It becomes a learning experience. It becomes... It feels like a personal evolution as you're doing it and you're growing and you're becoming a better person, better version of who you can be.

Chris:
So yeah, hopefully that's, that's helpful information for people. These are our goals that we talked about today. Hopefully you're thinking through what you want to do and how you want to be better. Thanks for listening. Subscribe to the podcast, wherever you're listening to it. We are on all sorts of apps and whatever, at YouTube, and if you're not in the Thermo Diet Facebook group yet, you'll check it out. Let's look for it.

Jayton:
Definitely. And if you have any questions, make sure to go to thermodiet.com

Chris:
Yeah, if you need supplements, go to umzu.com, the best supplement company on earth. We'll see you on the next podcast.

Jayton:
Have a good one.

Previous article Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 17A - Thermo Checklist for New Year
Next article Thermo Diet Podcast Episode 15 - Why We Do What We Do

Leave a comment

Comments must be approved before appearing

* Required fields